Yliopiston yhteiset tohtoriopinnot

Periods

Period I (27-Aug-2018 – 21-Oct-2018)
Period II (22-Oct-2018 – 14-Dec-2018)
Period III (7-Jan-2019 – 3-Mar-2019)
Period IV (4-Mar-2019 – 26-May-2019)
Period (27-Aug-2018 - 21-Oct-2018)
Doctoral School [Period I]

Course Moodle area at https://learning2.uta.fi/course/view.php?id=14400 . Key= TAYJ11

Learning outcomes:

The aim of this course is to strengthen the general researcher skills of the participant by training her to grasp her own particular field of research in a wider and more general context through some central issues in philosophy of science.

Teaching schedule: 19.10., 26.10.2018 at 9-16 o'clock.

Place: A3 Main building

General description:

The course consists of alternating sessions of lectures and discussions. The lectures will cover some central themes in philosophy of science, and these will then be further discussed in smaller groups whose members (to the extent that this is possible) come from related scientific fields.

Course contents:

  1. Objects of Study and the Classification of Sciences
  2. Concepts, Propositions, and Arguments
  3. Hypotheses, Explanations, and Justification
  4. Scientific Realism and Antirealism

Completion: Passing the course requires a tight following of the lectures and an active participation in the group discussions. There will be no final exam as such, but the participants are required to produce a three-page written presentation where one of the central themes of the course is connected with the participant’s own scientific field and research topic.

Teacher: Docent, PhD Heikki J. Koskinen

Enrolment in NettiOpsu. The maximum number of students is 50 (4 places reserved for TUT students). Selection method is draw. Enrolment period 1.8.-30.8.2018

 

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
19-Oct-2018 – 26-Oct-2018
Periods: I II
Language of instruction: English

Learning outcomes:

The participants understand that the “goodness” in good scientific practices has epistemic, moral, and social dimensions. They are familiar with Responsible conduct of research and Ethical principles of research in the humanities and social and behavioral sciences (The Finnish Advisory Board on Research Integrity) as well as The European code of conduct for research integrity. They are prepared to discuss ethical questions in their own research projects as well as the epistemic, moral, and social responsibilities of researchers.

Target audience:

Doctoral researchers in all disciplines and specialties

General description:

The course explains the epistemic, moral, and social justification for the principles of research ethics. It describes how ethical standards should guide data collection and management, scientific reasoning, social practices of scientific communities, management of research groups, the treatment of animal and human subjects in research, and the relations between researchers and the public.

Course content:

-          The reward system of science: tensions between researchers’ non-epistemic goals (e.g., career advancement) and the epistemic goals of science

-          Scientific misconduct, recklessness and gross negligence, and questionable research practices

-          Objectivity and the proper role of epistemic, moral, and social values in scientific inquiry

-          Scientific communities, research groups and co-authorship

-          Trust in/within science and conflicts of interest

-          Ethical standards in data collection and management

-          Good practices in supervision, funding application, manuscript submission and peer review

Course structure:

1. Lectures (12 h)

  • 3 x 4h

2. Independent study (Open Learning Research Ethics)

3. Workshop (12 h)

  • 2 x 6h

 

Lectures (time and place):

Mon 3.9.2018 at 12-16 (in Room C5 Main building)

Tue 11.9.2018 at 12-16 (in Room Kh3 Main building)

Wed 19.9.2018 at 12-16 (in Room C7 Main building)

Workshops (time and place):

3.10.2018 at 10-16 (in Room C7 Main building)

10.10.2018 at 10-16 (in Room C7 Main building)

Enrolment in NettiOpsu. Maximum group size 20 (course is for UTA and TUT doctoral researchers). Priority is given to English language doctoral researchers. Otherwise selection method is draw. Enrolment period 1.8.-15.8.2018

Requirements:

1. Pre-course assignment (1-2 pages)

2. Active participation in lectures and workshops

3. Presentation in the workshop (15-20 min)

4. Final essay (6-7 pages)

Pre-course assignment:

Read David Resnik’s (2015) article and write an essay (1-2 pages). Discuss at least three ethical principles mentioned by Resnik. Explain why these principles are important in your own research project or in your discipline/specialty. How are they relevant to research ethical questions or challenges you have met while you have been engaged in your research? Be sure to mention your name, discipline, research topic, and research group/collaboration (if applicable). The assignment is submitted via Moodle.

Resnik, David. 2015. What is Ethics in Research & Why is it Important?

https://www.niehs.nih.gov/research/resources/bioethics/whatis/index.cfm 

Teacher:

University Lecturer in Research Ethics

Evaluation:

Pass/fail

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
3-Sep-2018 – 10-Oct-2018
Periods: I
Language of instruction: English

Learning outcomes: After the course, the students are familiar with different ways of conducting interviews, have a thorough understanding of the contextual nature and key features of interaction in interviews, and are able to critically evaluate studies based on interview data.

Teacher in charge: Matti Hyvärinen

Lecturers: Lotta Junnilainen, Mari Korpela,  Pirjo Nikander, Ilkka Pietilä, Eeva Puumala, Markku Sippola, Rebecca Lund

Course description:

Interviewing is one of the classic means of data collection. Recently, it is often framed more in terms of an interactional encounter instead of simple data gathering or collection.  Consequently, the emphasis is moving from questioning towards listening and encouraging. This course consists of four days of contact teaching, lectures from researchers with extensive expertise of various forms of interviews as well as workshops, in which the students have the chance to introduce their own research projects. The course covers key elements pertinent to data generation through interviewing as well as expert lectures on one-on-one interviews, focus groups, and interviews in narrative and ethnographic research. The workshops, based on student presentations on their ongoing doctoral thesis, provide a joint discussion platform to develop key questions, open up questions on various steps of the interview process, and to raise special questions linked with different data generation traditions. The discussions provide students the opportunity to share joint problems, and to receive feedback and new ideas from fellow students and lecturers on their research designs and analytic procedure.

Teaching: Contact teaching covers 22 hours (16 hours of lectures and 6 hours of workshops).

Pre-assignment: Before the course, enrolled students are expected to write a one page description of their own doctoral research, introducing research topics and questions, data utilized, and possible analytic methods in use. The pre-assignment should also include each participant’s prior ideas and potential concerns regarding generating interview data. The students will reconsider these ideas and concerns in their reflection papers that are prepared after the contact teaching period. Detailed instructions will be made available to enrolled students through Moodle.

Course reading: tba

Number of students: 25 students, of which 10 will have an opportunity to introduce their own research project to other participants. Selection will be made on the basis of pre-assignments. Enrolment period 1.8.-15.8.2018.

Study credits: Students introducing their own research in the workshops will receive 5 ECTS and other students 3 ECTS. For completing the course all students are expected to conduct the pre-assignment, actively participate in contact teaching, and prepare a reflection paper (3-5 pages) focusing on how the course has improved their skills to plan and conduct interviews as well as increased their understanding of data generation and analysis of interviews. Students’ presentations in workshops will consist of 10-15 minutes’ talks and a written summary (1 page) of the project. In addition, each presenter is also supposed to act as a discussant for another student’s presentation.

Preliminary schedule:

 

Thu, Sep 6

Room C6 (Main building)

10 :15 - 12 Matti Hyvärinen : «Introduction « Interviewing or asking questions ? »

12 :30 – 14 Markku Sippola : « Recruitment of interviewees: Problems and biases.”

14 :15 – 16 WORKSHOP : participants’ papers

 

Wed Sep 12

Room A3 (Main building)

10 :15 - 12 Pirjo Nikander : «Key (and difficult) questions to anyone planning to use and analyse interview data”

12:30  Mari Korpela: ”Interviewing in ethnographic research”

14 :15 – 16  WORKSHOP : participants’ papers

 

Thu Sep 13

Room C6 (Main building)

10 :15 – 12  Lotta Junnilainen : "Interviewing in ethnographic research on urban inequality”

12 :30 -14  Ilkka Pietilä : «Focus groups »

14 :15 – 16  WORKSHOP : participants’ papers

 

Fri Sep 14

Room C6 (Main building)

10:15 – 12 Eeva Puumala: “Transcultural interviews”

12:30 – 14 Rebecca Lund: “Interviewing in institutional ethnography”

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
6-Sep-2018 – 14-Sep-2018
Periods: I
Language of instruction: English

Learning outcomes:

This course will give you practical tips and strategies for writing scientific articles in English. Designed as a two-day workshop, the main objective of this course is to learn to identify and produce the most important elements in English academic writing. The first day offers a series of exercises and points to ponder, whereas the second day offers the students an opportunity to apply these tips and strategies in an "Editing Clinic". During the second day, the students will be taught a ten-step editing process that they will apply to texts in class.

Contents:

Day 1

Group 1, 20.9.2018 at 9-16 o'clock (Pinni B 4115)

Group 2, 27.9.2018 at 9-16 o'clock (Pinni B 4115)

9:15-9:45  Online sources: Scientific, clear, transparent
9:45-11:00 Drafting, Differences between Finnish and Anglo-American traditions
11:00-11:30  Components of a Scientific Article, The Sequence of Writing
11:30 Lunch
12:15 Problems, Transitions, Tenses
14:00 Coffee break
14:15 Old Information and New Information, Nouns and Verbs for Academic Writing
15:30 Self-editing
16:00 End of the day

Scientific Writing: The "Editing Clinic": Revising English Texts

Day 2, 4.10.2018 at 9-16 o'clock (both groups)

at 9-13 Room A3 (Main building), at 13-16 Room Kh3 (Main building)

The students select a scientific text from their field and also bring in two to three pages of their own writing (5 copies of these pages). These texts will be evaluated in class.

9:15-10:30 Introduction to editing. Practice of editing on the "ideal" article in your field
10:30-10:40 Short break
10:40-11:30 Editing
11:30-12:10 Lunch  (40 min.)
12:10-14:00 Editing groups
14:00-14:20 Coffee break (20 min.)
14:20-15:25  Editing Groups
15:25-16:00  Course Discussions (Questions and Answers)
16:00   End of the course

Teacher: Lecturer Kathleen Moore

Enrolment in NettiOpsu. The maximum number of students is 18 in both groups. Selection method is draw. The student has to check the selection from NettiOpsu (Courses > Enrolments) after the enrolment period. 2 places per group reserved for TUT students. Enrolment period 1.8.-30.8.2018.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
20-Sep-2018 – 4-Oct-2018
Periods: I
Language of instruction: English

Learning outcomes: The aim of this course is to strengthen the transferable grant writing skills and increase the understanding on these skills as part of researcher’s  career. The course will give practical tips and strategies for grant writing.

After completing the course, you will

  • know basic strategic principles, how to strengthen your skills in grant writing in the academic context,
  • understand the research funding system, especially in Finland,
  • be able to identify different types of research funding opportunities for your doctoral research,
  • recognize main relevant research funding foundations in your research field,
  • be able to clarify the impact and implementation of your research from the research funding agency point of view,
  • be able to improve  your grant proposal abstract from the research funding agency point of view,
  • be able to strengthen your research networking, which will also support your grant writing skills,
  • understand better the position of mobility as the part of research grant proposal, 
  • be able to make the draft budget of your research activities for the foundation.

 

Contents:

Part 1 - The ground for the grant writing

Part 2 - The funding sources (esp. foundations)

Part 3 – How to improve the description of impact and implementation of the research?

Part 4 – The features of good abstract of the grant proposal

Part 5 - Mobility and networking

 

Modes of study:

There’s two possibilities in studying this course. Online learning material will be used in both options.

Group 1) Online course, together with 3 hours introduction lectures (1 ECTS);

Group 2) Online course, together with 11 hours of contact teaching in Finnish (2 ECTS).

In both options, the participants are expected to take part in introductory lecture 12.9.2018 and complete the exercises via Moodle on time by utilizing the course materials present on the platform. The exercises include short essays, comments and quizzes.

Group size:

Group 1) online course together with 3 hours introduction available for all (introductory lecture and online course is in English language)

Group 2) online course plus contact teaching (3 hours introduction, 8 hours teaching) for 20 persons (contact teaching in autumn 2018 is in Finnish language)

Course is for UTA and TUT doctoral researchers.

Teaching schedule: 

Wed 12.9.2018, at 13-16: Introductory lecture in lecture hall Pinni B1097. Open to all.

Group 2: Contact teaching weekly on Thu 4.10-25.10.2018, at 14.15-16. Room C7 Main building.

Each of the five online course modules will last from one to two weeks. All exercises are to be returned on 1.11.2018 at the latest.

Enrolment: Via Nettiopsu. Selection method is draw for the online+contact teaching course (in Finnish, Group 2). Enrolment period 1.8.-30.8.2018.

Evaluation: Pass/fail

Evaluation criteria: Active participation in web-based working and exercises done on time.

More information: virve.kallioniemi-chambers (at) uta.fi

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
12-Sep-2018 – 25-Oct-2018
Periods: I
Language of instruction: English

General description

Planning makes perfect they say, and this holds true also when it comes to academic work. Do you wish to stop and think ahead how to make best use of your time, and to develop both your academic and transferable skills as a doctoral researcher? This concise two-day course provides practical tools and support for the management of the 4-year doctoral thesis project. The course is directed at doctoral researchers at the beginning phase of their studies.

The course
- Guides participants to identify and use the various tools already at their disposal
- Discusses forms of supervision and the supervisor- supervisee relationship
- Provides concrete tools for planning & managing the writing process
- Encourages doctoral researchers to better their media skills and digital research profiles
- Discusses how to use academic conferences as a means of chapter and article writing
- Encourages doctoral researchers to share their experiences and expertise

Place: A31 Main building

Programme:

Day 1:31.10.2018 (please note changed date!)
09.15-12.00   Identifying academic skills and tools
12.00-13.00    lunch break
13.00-16.00   ‘Using’ vs. ‘going to’ academic conferences: A before - during and after model


Day 2: 14.11.2018 (please note changed date!)
09.15-12.00   Having a practical map for it all: drafting your thesis outline
  Developing and updating our own digital research profile
12.00-13.00   lunch break
13.00-16.00   Giving and receiving feedback: supervisory relationships from start to finish.

PLEASE NOTE: Attendance to BOTH days is required for the completion of the course.

Teacher: Dr. Pirjo Nikander

Pre-assignment: Please write a short (one A4) text stating:
1)    Your name & field of research
2)    The format of your thesis to be (article doctorate/monograph)
3)    3 key journals + 3 key conferences in your own field
4)    3 issues that you find are the most challenging when it comes to managing the day-to-day reality of thesis writing.
5)    Your digital profile today. Do you use: ResearchGate, Twitter, Academia.edu, or LinkedIn?

DEADLINE for the pre-assignments is to be announced.
In addition participants will write a mini-assignment before the second meeting. Both assignments will be sent through Moodle,

Enrolment via NettiOpsu. Maximum number of students is 20. Selection method is draw. Students should check the selection result via NettiOpsu after the enrolment period. 2 places reserved for TUT students. Enrolment period 1.8.-30.8.2018.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
31-Oct-2018 – 14-Nov-2018
Periods: I
Language of instruction: English

Learning outcomes

After the course, the participants 
•    have a deeper understanding of the need, importance and practicalities of research mobility 
•    are aware of and able to identify opportunities available to undertake international research mobility 
•    know the different sources of funding available and how best to access them 
•    are able to design a mobility plan 
•    receive the necessary support to execute their mobility plan

Description
International research mobility is a crucial part of academic life for universities and particularly for the early stage researcher. Shorter and longer-term stays abroad not only support one’s research work, develop one’s research qualification and network but also contribute to personal development and networking skills on a broad range. This course offers practical tools, guide, information and support necessary to successfully engage in international mobility during one’s doctoral research career.

Course Schedule

Day 1: 9.10.2018
Time: 9-16
Place: C7 Main building

9:15-9:30 Opening words, Participants’ introduction
9:30-10:30 Research Mobility: What, why, how, when and where? 
10:30-11:00 UTA policy and support for mobility – Lecture by International education office 
11:00-11:30 Funding opportunities for mobility 1 (Internal and external funding)
11:30-12:30 Lunch
12:30-13:30 Funding opportunities for mobility 2 (Workshop tailored to student’s need): databases and search strategies (in Computer classroom 3, Main building)
13:30-14:30 Practical issues to consider before, during and after mobility (International HR office)
14:30-14:45 Coffee break
14:45-15:30 Cultural issues commonly faced during mobility 
15:30-16:00 Instructions on assignment and groups

Day 2: 23.10.2018
Time: 9-16 
Place: C7 Main building


9:15-9:30 Working in a new environment
9:30-10:00 Building useful networks
10:00-11:00 Class discussion- Participants to share insights from the interviews conducted (see below)
11:00-11:15 Coffee Break
11:15-12:15 Group session for peer-to-peer feedback on mobility plan

12:15-13:15 Lunch
13:15-14:15 Funding opportunities for mobility 3 (Workshop tailored to student’s need): databases and search strategies (in Computer classroom 3, Main building)
14:15-14:45 Preparing an application, budget and necessary documents relating to mobility

14:45-15:15 Optimising your mobility for future career opportunities
15:15-15:30 Questions and answers (International education office and International HR office)

15:30-15:45 Closing words

Teacher: M.Sci. Motolani Agbebi 

Pre-assignment: To participate in this course, please provide a short pre-assignment through Moodle outlining the following: 
•    Your name and discipline
•    Stage in doctoral studies 
•    Two main issues you would most like to know about undertaking research mobility or obstacles to undertaking research mobility
•    Details of your mobility experience or plans if any, and mobility types and potential funding sources/forms you wish to target.

Between the course days’ assignment: 
•    participants will be asked to discuss their plan or desire to embark on a study or research visit abroad with their supervisor(s), should they not have already done so
•    Participants are required to design a mobility plan.
•    Participants are to carry out an interview with one researcher (preferably doctoral researcher or post-doc researcher) in their faculty on the overall experience during mobility. This should include details on planning, being and returning from a period abroad. 
•    Participants are required to submit an updated mobility plan a week after the course is completed. Students will be strongly encouraged and offered support by the doctoral school, the international office and their supervisors to implement their mobility plans.

Enrolment: In Nettiopsu. Max. 20 (priority will be given to 2nd year doctoral students, otherwise selection method is draw). 2 places reserved for TUT students. Enrolment period 1.8.-30.8.2018.

Organised by: UTA Doctoral School and UTA International Education Office

Modes of completion: Pre-Assignment, mobility plan, active participation, peer-to-peer feedback.

 

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
9-Oct-2018 – 23-Oct-2018
Periods: I
Language of instruction: English

Target group: New and newish non-Finnish doctoral researchers of the University of Tampere

Content: Organization of doctoral studies at the University of Tampere, Joint doctoral studies, Funding opportunities, Library services, Supervision and planning of studies

Time: Fri 31.8.2018

Place: Room A32 Main building

Programme:

13.15-13.30 Welcome to the University of Tampere
13.30-14.00 Organization of doctoral studies at the University of Tampere, Joint doctoral studies (coordinator Olli Nuutinen, UTA Doctoral School)
14.00-14.30 Funding opportunities (Senior planning officer Virve Kallioniemi-Chambers, UTA Doctoral School)
14.30-14.50 International HR Team at Your Service! (HR specialist Nuppu Suvanto, UTA)
14.50-15.10 Coffee break
15.10-15.30 Library services (Information specialist Tomi Toikko, UTA library)
15.30-16.00 Supervision and tips on Planning and Managing your Doctoral Process (Research Director Pirjo Nikander, UTA Doctoral School)
16.00 -16.20 About University of Tampere Association of Researchers and Teachers (Jussi Jalonen, Yulia Shumilova)

Responsible teacher: Dr. Pirjo Nikander

Pre-registration with e-form https://elomake3.uta.fi/lomakkeet/827/lomake.html?rinnakkaislomake=registration. Enrolment period until 29.8.2018.

NB! No credits are awarded.

Enrolment for University Studies
Teaching
31-Aug-2018 – 31-Aug-2018
Periods: I
Language of instruction: English

The Speakers Series is a series of Studia Generalia Lectures in the Study of Society organized every other week by the University of Tampere Institute for Advanced Social Research (IASR) in cooperation with the New Social Research Programme (NSR). The lectures are given by the Research Fellows as well as the distinguished guests of the IASR and the NSR. For the programme, please check the IASR website www.uta.fi/iasr/lectures/.

Most doctoral students can also get 2 ECTS for attending a minimum of six IASR Lectures, altogether 6 ECTS at the maximum. These 2 ECTS for attending 6 lectures can be earned during two successive terms.

What is the IASR? – The Institute for Advanced Social Research, IASR) is the research collegium of the University of Tampere. It grants annually one- or two-year research positions for Professorial Fellows, Senior Research Fellows and Postdoctoral Research Fellows studying society to promote high-level multidisciplinary research and international interaction in the university.

Responsible teacher: Dr. Risto Heiskala

No pre-registration.

Periods: I II
Language of instruction: English

Learning goals and outcomes:
This course aims to increase awareness of the ethical considerations with regard to development of new technology (technoethics), particularly focusing on information technology. The course provides concepts and perspectives for analyzing, reconsidering and, if necessary, regulating the development of new technologies and their use. Considering the broad concept of ethics, focus areas include social sustainability and morality of the types of technology that are rarely regulated (e.g., digitalization, artificial intelligence & robotization, social media, data analytics).

Please note that this course is different from the mandatory “Research Ethics” course: this focuses on the moral considerations in envisioning and designing new technologies, while the other focuses on ethics of carrying out research.

After the course, the student:
-    Is familiar with central concepts and theoretical frameworks related to technoethics
-    Can identify and understand critical ethical considerations related to different kinds of information technology
-    Has theoretical readiness to analyze the long-term ethical and societal effects of technological applications and to provide constructive guidance for the development
-    Is able to apply related theoretical knowledge in design and conceptualization of new technology

Target group: The course is intended for doctoral researchers in any field. No particular prerequisite knowledge or courses are required. The purpose is to bring together scholars from different fields to discuss different viewpoints and theoretical frameworks regarding the course topic.

General description: The course outlines various ethical challenges and approaches regarding the design of new technology. The lectures conceptualize and problematize various trends and approaches to technology and provide analytical perspectives that help direct the development of ethically sustainable future technologies. The practical assignment aims to cross-pollinate different ways of thinking, preconceptions, and theoretical frameworks across various disciplines, allowing the students to reflect their own work and the fields they represent.

Contents:
1.    Conceptual overview and motivation: technoethics, technological utopias vs. dystopias, theoretical frameworks for ethics, some specific ethical stances such as hacker ethics, categories of sustainability, determinism vs. social constructionism, critical design
2.    Algorithmic socio-technical systems: Social bubbles & echo chambers, polarization, marginalization, mediatedness of social interaction, other adverse social and societal effects, embedding human bias into AI
3.    Surveillance: identity, privacy, new data protection regulations, the dark side of digital maps and positioning technologies, block chains and de-centralization
4.    Governance: agency and responsibilities in shaping the future technologies, logic of digital platforms, the power of the internet giants, business logic shaping professional values (e.g., in journalism)
5.    Attention: attention grabbing, attention economy, maximizing screen time, developing information addiction, audience funneling mechanisms
6.    Long-term impact: long-term perspectives and effects, what is work in the future, dependence on technology,
7.    Values in technology design: value systems and paradigms, unethical user interfaces, technological independence, dark patterns (Greenberg et al. 2014)

Expected activities:
1.    Pre-task (1-2 pages)
2.    Active participation in lectures (12-16 hours)
3.    Group assignment in inter-disciplinary groups of 3-4 members: analyzing and problematizing certain predefined topics, coupled with a review of relevant critical literature and designs
4.    Presentation of the group assignment (15-20 min.)
5.    Acting as opponent in the presentations
6.    Personal essay  (6-10 pages)

Teaching schedule

Fri 28.9. at 12-15 o'clock in Pinni B4113

Tue 30.10. at 12-15 o'clock in Virta 113

Mon 12.11. at 9-16 o'clock in C8 Main building

Mon 17.12. at 12-16 o'clock in Pinni B4113

Tue 18.12. at 12-16 o'clock in Pinni B4113



Enrollment: The participants will be selected with draw. Max. 30 students will be selected. Course is for UTA and TUT doctoral researchers. Enrolment period 1.8.-30.8.2018.


Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
28-Sep-2018 – 18-Dec-2018
Periods: I II
Language of instruction: English

The course focuses on the basic and general features of scientific research, methodology, and argumentation, as applicable to any field of study. Some central themes in the philosophy of science will also be discussed, in an introductory manner.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
7-Sep-2018 – 26-Oct-2018
Periods: I II
Language of instruction: English
Further information:

The course is intended to all new international UTA Master’s degree students, but it will serve also international Doctoral students. Other degree and exchange students may join if there are free places.

Contact person: Coordinator of international education, Anna Wansén-Kaseva

This course explores methods for the analysis of longitudinal data and latent variable methods for linear models, generalized linear models, and nonlinear models.  Focusing on applications, this course explores: the analysis of repeated measures ANOVA, multivariate approaches, random-effects regression, covariance-pattern models, generalized-estimating equations and generalizations, latent variable methods including finite mixture modelling, and likelihood methods.  Students will develop expertise using the SAS and R computer packages, although no previous programming experience will be assumed.  Grading is based on homework and computer assignments and a project, as well as several exams.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
17-Sep-2018 – 21-Oct-2018
Periods: I
Language of instruction: English
Further information:

Course begins with a lecture on Monday 17th of September.

There are three exams during the course.

Recommended preceding studies:

Basic courses of statistics and Regression analysis

Period (22-Oct-2018 - 14-Dec-2018)
Doctoral School [Period II]

Course Moodle area at https://learning2.uta.fi/course/view.php?id=14400 . Key= TAYJ11

Learning outcomes:

The aim of this course is to strengthen the general researcher skills of the participant by training her to grasp her own particular field of research in a wider and more general context through some central issues in philosophy of science.

Teaching schedule: 19.10., 26.10.2018 at 9-16 o'clock.

Place: A3 Main building

General description:

The course consists of alternating sessions of lectures and discussions. The lectures will cover some central themes in philosophy of science, and these will then be further discussed in smaller groups whose members (to the extent that this is possible) come from related scientific fields.

Course contents:

  1. Objects of Study and the Classification of Sciences
  2. Concepts, Propositions, and Arguments
  3. Hypotheses, Explanations, and Justification
  4. Scientific Realism and Antirealism

Completion: Passing the course requires a tight following of the lectures and an active participation in the group discussions. There will be no final exam as such, but the participants are required to produce a three-page written presentation where one of the central themes of the course is connected with the participant’s own scientific field and research topic.

Teacher: Docent, PhD Heikki J. Koskinen

Enrolment in NettiOpsu. The maximum number of students is 50 (4 places reserved for TUT students). Selection method is draw. Enrolment period 1.8.-30.8.2018

 

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
19-Oct-2018 – 26-Oct-2018
Periods: I II
Language of instruction: English

Learning outcomes:

Goal of this online course is to get the participant acquainted with the processes of systematic information management within the participants’ own research work. After completing the course, the participant

  • will be able to seek and manage information efficiently
  • recognizes how metrics can be utilized in evaluating scientific visibility and impact
  • understands the open science principles in research publication and can assess scientific publication channels
  • knows the key principles of research data management

Student group: Doctoral researchers and researchers

Contents:
Module 1: Scientific literature retrieval
Module 2: Visibility and impact
Module 3: Research data management
Module 4: Open Access publishing

Organised by: Tampere University Library

People in charge: Tomi Toikko, Sari Leppänen, Saija Tapio

Teaching period:   All modules will last for one week.

Modes of study: Online course. Starting date 22.10.2018.  The participant is expected to complete the weekly exercises on time by utilizing the course materials present on the platform. The exercises include short essays, quizzes and discussions with other participants.

Group size: No limit

Enrolment: Via Nettiopsu. This course is open only for doctoral researchers and researchers of the University of Tampere.

Enrolment time: 1.8.-17.10.2018.

Evaluation: Pass/fail

Evaluation criteria: Active participation in web-based working and exercises done on time.

More information: tomi.toikko@staff.uta.fi

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
22-Oct-2018 – 14-Dec-2018
Periods: II
Language of instruction: English

The Speakers Series is a series of Studia Generalia Lectures in the Study of Society organized every other week by the University of Tampere Institute for Advanced Social Research (IASR) in cooperation with the New Social Research Programme (NSR). The lectures are given by the Research Fellows as well as the distinguished guests of the IASR and the NSR. For the programme, please check the IASR website www.uta.fi/iasr/lectures/.

Most doctoral students can also get 2 ECTS for attending a minimum of six IASR Lectures, altogether 6 ECTS at the maximum. These 2 ECTS for attending 6 lectures can be earned during two successive terms.

What is the IASR? – The Institute for Advanced Social Research, IASR) is the research collegium of the University of Tampere. It grants annually one- or two-year research positions for Professorial Fellows, Senior Research Fellows and Postdoctoral Research Fellows studying society to promote high-level multidisciplinary research and international interaction in the university.

Responsible teacher: Dr. Risto Heiskala

No pre-registration.

Periods: I II
Language of instruction: English

Learning goals and outcomes:
This course aims to increase awareness of the ethical considerations with regard to development of new technology (technoethics), particularly focusing on information technology. The course provides concepts and perspectives for analyzing, reconsidering and, if necessary, regulating the development of new technologies and their use. Considering the broad concept of ethics, focus areas include social sustainability and morality of the types of technology that are rarely regulated (e.g., digitalization, artificial intelligence & robotization, social media, data analytics).

Please note that this course is different from the mandatory “Research Ethics” course: this focuses on the moral considerations in envisioning and designing new technologies, while the other focuses on ethics of carrying out research.

After the course, the student:
-    Is familiar with central concepts and theoretical frameworks related to technoethics
-    Can identify and understand critical ethical considerations related to different kinds of information technology
-    Has theoretical readiness to analyze the long-term ethical and societal effects of technological applications and to provide constructive guidance for the development
-    Is able to apply related theoretical knowledge in design and conceptualization of new technology

Target group: The course is intended for doctoral researchers in any field. No particular prerequisite knowledge or courses are required. The purpose is to bring together scholars from different fields to discuss different viewpoints and theoretical frameworks regarding the course topic.

General description: The course outlines various ethical challenges and approaches regarding the design of new technology. The lectures conceptualize and problematize various trends and approaches to technology and provide analytical perspectives that help direct the development of ethically sustainable future technologies. The practical assignment aims to cross-pollinate different ways of thinking, preconceptions, and theoretical frameworks across various disciplines, allowing the students to reflect their own work and the fields they represent.

Contents:
1.    Conceptual overview and motivation: technoethics, technological utopias vs. dystopias, theoretical frameworks for ethics, some specific ethical stances such as hacker ethics, categories of sustainability, determinism vs. social constructionism, critical design
2.    Algorithmic socio-technical systems: Social bubbles & echo chambers, polarization, marginalization, mediatedness of social interaction, other adverse social and societal effects, embedding human bias into AI
3.    Surveillance: identity, privacy, new data protection regulations, the dark side of digital maps and positioning technologies, block chains and de-centralization
4.    Governance: agency and responsibilities in shaping the future technologies, logic of digital platforms, the power of the internet giants, business logic shaping professional values (e.g., in journalism)
5.    Attention: attention grabbing, attention economy, maximizing screen time, developing information addiction, audience funneling mechanisms
6.    Long-term impact: long-term perspectives and effects, what is work in the future, dependence on technology,
7.    Values in technology design: value systems and paradigms, unethical user interfaces, technological independence, dark patterns (Greenberg et al. 2014)

Expected activities:
1.    Pre-task (1-2 pages)
2.    Active participation in lectures (12-16 hours)
3.    Group assignment in inter-disciplinary groups of 3-4 members: analyzing and problematizing certain predefined topics, coupled with a review of relevant critical literature and designs
4.    Presentation of the group assignment (15-20 min.)
5.    Acting as opponent in the presentations
6.    Personal essay  (6-10 pages)

Teaching schedule

Fri 28.9. at 12-15 o'clock in Pinni B4113

Tue 30.10. at 12-15 o'clock in Virta 113

Mon 12.11. at 9-16 o'clock in C8 Main building

Mon 17.12. at 12-16 o'clock in Pinni B4113

Tue 18.12. at 12-16 o'clock in Pinni B4113



Enrollment: The participants will be selected with draw. Max. 30 students will be selected. Course is for UTA and TUT doctoral researchers. Enrolment period 1.8.-30.8.2018.


Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
28-Sep-2018 – 18-Dec-2018
Periods: I II
Language of instruction: English

Learning Objectives

On completion of the course, successful participants will be able to:

  • recognize and apply the rhetorical conventions of academic discourse (i.e., argumentation, cohesion);
  • identify and employ features of academic grammar in their own writing (i.e., register, tense, voice);
  • analyze academic texts to assess the relevancy of research writing both within and outside their own field;
  • demonstrate their professional responsibility by engaging in peer-review;
  • understand the expectations of their target audience to tailor their own research articles for specific contexts;
  • and display competence in meeting the basic professional and academic expectations of researchers.

Contents

This multidisciplinary course offers doctoral students the opportunity to improve their writing for research skills. One focus of the course aims to familiarize students with the rhetorical conventions of academic discourse, including style, structure, and grammar. Students will apply these skills to their own field-specific discipline—and also outside of it—with the aim of developing their academic fluency through the critical assessment of texts.

A second focus of this course is the development of a writing project, where students will assess their own writing (a research article or dissertation chapter, for example) and their colleagues’ writing, as well. Central to this course is the effective communication of new knowledge created during the PhD (and beyond it). As it will help you to plan, begin, and/or continue your doctoral research project, this course therefore functions to facilitate your attempt to contribute to your research field.  

Writing for Research is taught as a partly-online course with both face-to-face and online interaction. To attain the intended learning outcomes, students will take an active participatory role in classes. Thus, to pass the course, students must attend all classes and complete all online and class task.

Target group

The course is intended for post-graduate students who feel that they need support in writing and reading research in English.

Proficiency level

B2=>C1 (European framework)

Contact classes, online work, and independent assignments.

Schedule and place:


November 2, 2018 at 12.00-16.00 in Room C7 Main building, continues online
Topic: Academic style and structure

November 16, 2018 at 12.00-16.00 in Room Kh 3 Main building, continues online
Topic: Academic argumentation

November 23, 2018 at 12.00-16.00, in Room C5 Main building (note room change!), continues online until December 7, 2018.
Topic: Peer review for style, structure, and argumentation in writing groups

Teacher: Christine Horton

Student selection

At the maximum 20 students group. Selection method is draw. The student has to check the selection from NettiOpsu after the enrolment period. 2 places reserved for TUT students.

Evaluation and evaluation criteria

Continuous self-assessment, peer assessment and assessment by the instructor. Pass/fail.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
2-Nov-2018 – 7-Dec-2018
Periods: II
Language of instruction: English

Goals:
1. To begin, proceed, digress, summarize and end a presentation, and to respond to questions in an effective manner
2. To convert written into spoken English: stylistic differences
3. To practice correct pronunciation and intonation
4. To deliver a talk in a relaxed manner using effective visual aids, but without reading
5. To analyze one's own presentation and (in groups) others' presentations in a supportive, affirmative manner, including attention to body language and visual aids.

Contents:

Day 1  (common to both groups)

15.11.2018 in Kh3 (Main building)

9:15-10:30 Structure of English presentations; Introduction and Conclusions-tips
10:30-10:45 Break
10:45-11:30 Language performance issues
11:30-12:10   Lunch
12:10-14:00   Preparing and Using Visuals: Tips and Concerns
14:00-14:20   Coffee
14:20-16:00   Training for the Question-and-Answer period at conferences

Day 2 

- group 1: 22.11.2018 in Linna K108
- group 2: 29.11.2018 
in D14 (Main building)

9:15-10:30  Individual Presentations + Judges feedback and evaluation
10:30-10:45  Break
10:45-11:30  Individual Presentations + Judges feedback and evaluation
11:30-12:10  Lunch
12:10-14:00  Individual Presentations + Judges feedback and evaluation
14:00-14:20 Coffee
14:20-16:00  Individual Presentations + Judges feedback and evaluation

Teacher: Lecturer Kathleen Moore

Enrolment in NettiOpsu. The maximum number of students is 10 in all  groups. The selection method is draw. The student has to check the selection from NettiOpsu (Courses > Enrolments) after the enrolment period. 1 place per group reserved for TUT students.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
15-Nov-2018 – 29-Nov-2018
Periods: II
Language of instruction: English

Learning outcomes: Students acquire skills in project management to be able to participate in demanding project design and completion tasks. After the course students can use main project management tools such as project plan, work division and risk analysis. Students master activities in  project life-cycle such as starting a project, organizing and defining a project, planning, completing and steering and finishing a project. Also budgeting is a part of project planning.

General description: The aim of the course is to give students practical ability to plan and complete different kinds of development projects. Course fits for doctoral researchers in all disciplines and does not require prior knowledge.

Working mode

Course uses blended learning so that there is three days contact learning and individual learning through Moodle learning environment.

Contact teaching

Tue 13.11.2018 at 9-15 in A2B Main building

Tue 27.11.2018 at 9-15 in Virta 114

Tue 11.12.2018 at 9-15 in Virta 113

Assessment

Scale: Pass – Fail. Assessment criteria is active participation in contact teaching and approved completion of given course work.

Course material

Material prepared and assigned by teacher and a book Horine, Gregory: Absolute Beginner’s Guide to Project Management (2010->). Moodle learning environment is in use.

Enrolment: Enrolment in Nettiopsu. Course is for both UTA and TUT doctoral researchers. At the maximum 30 person group. Selection method is draw.

 

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
13-Nov-2018 – 11-Dec-2018
Periods: II
Language of instruction: English

The course focuses on the basic and general features of scientific research, methodology, and argumentation, as applicable to any field of study. Some central themes in the philosophy of science will also be discussed, in an introductory manner.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
7-Sep-2018 – 26-Oct-2018
Periods: I II
Language of instruction: English
Further information:

The course is intended to all new international UTA Master’s degree students, but it will serve also international Doctoral students. Other degree and exchange students may join if there are free places.

Contact person: Coordinator of international education, Anna Wansén-Kaseva

General description

Knowledge about statistical methods and data analysis is of great importance in almost any field of research. In this course, general concepts of statistics will be provided so that students can be able to independently carry out a small scale empirical research with the statistical software SPSS or R. After the course, students should be familiar with the basic concepts of statistics, ranging from descriptive statistics, basic inference (estimation, confidence intervals and hypothesis testing), linear models (analysis of variance, simple and multiple linear regression), non-parametric tests and logistic regression.

Enrolment for University Studies

Space is limited in this course due to computer room capacity. Priority will be granted for the first enrolments, based on the proportions: 60% PhD students and 40% for BSc and MSc students.

Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
22-Oct-2018 – 21-Nov-2018
Periods: II
Language of instruction: English
Further information:

Please note that this course cannot be included inside the minimum 120 ECTS of Master's Degree Programme in CBDA (basic level course).

MTTTP1 Tilastotieteen johdantokurssi lectured in period I, II or III-IV is recommended for Finnish students.

Period (7-Jan-2019 - 3-Mar-2019)
Doctoral School [Period III]

Visualization of quantitative data when reporting and publishing findings

Course description:

It is commonly said that “a picture is worth a thousand words”. The same is true when reporting findings of an analysis of quantitative data. A proper visualization of the results might make the difference between the success and failure in telling a story or in publishing one’s findings. This course gives, first, a brief introduction to the R software. Second, the course focuses on visualization of quantitative data which is of utmost importance when reporting and publishing findings. Examples and applications will be done for multivariate, temporal, spatial and text data. Examples used during the course will be based on the R software, and preliminary knowledge of this software is required.

Goals: The course:

  • Introduces participants to the R environment
  • Introduces the participants to data exploration and data visualization
  • Provides a recent variety of techniques and strategies to visualize quantitative data

Place: Computer classroom Ml 50 Linna building

Programme

11.1.2019

09.15-12.00   Introduction to R

12.00-13.00   Lunch break

13.00-16.00   Introduction to data exploration and data visualization: types of data and of databases; online databases; Visualization of multivariate data

18.1.2019

09.15-12.00   Visualization of temporal data and of spatial data; text visualization

12.00-13.00   lunch break

13.00-16.00 Real time big data applications

PLEASE NOTE: Attendance to BOTH days is required for the completion of the course.

Teacher: Paulo Canas Rodrigues

Pre-assignment: Please write a short (one A4) text stating:

1)    Your name & disciplinary background

2)    State your own motivation for participating on this course and what do you expect to learn.

DEADLINE for the pre-assignments to be announced.

In addition, participants will write a mini-assignment after the second meeting with a two weeks’ deadline.

Enrolment via NettiOpsu. Maximum number of students is 24. Selection method is draw. Students should check the selection result via NettiOpsu after the enrolment period.

 

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
11-Jan-2019 – 18-Jan-2019
Periods: III
Language of instruction: English

Learning Outcomes

After completing this course, the doctoral researcher:

  • masters the central concepts of theory of science
  • conceives the main features of central approaches to philosophy of science
  • understands profoundly the features of scientific conduct and is able to apply them in her/his own work
  • recognizes the theory of science questions specific to her/his own field and is able to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of typical answers given to them
  • understands the differences between various branches of science and respects them

General description

Philosophy of science examines and explain the nature of science and its distinctive features among forms of human inquiry. Distinguishing genuine science from activities that cannot be called scientific is closely linked to characterization of the scientific method. This course introduces the core issues in the philosophy of science, the debates about the nature of the scientific method, theories of confirmation, and the demarcation of science from non-science. Participants will learn about the key thinkers in philosophy of science, and gain practical and deeper understanding of their own doctorate research projects.

Course is given in Moodle learning environment as an online course in spring period 1. in 2019. Course consists of the following parts:

  1. Science
  2. Knowledge and Truth
  3. Perception, Cognition and Biases
  4. Philosophical Positions
  5. Theories and Models
  6. Scientific Inference and Explaining
  7. Concepts and Definitions
  8. Quantitative and Qualitative Research
  9. Quality of Research

To complete the course and get 3 ECTS, doctoral researchers are required to:

  • actively engage with the course materials and discussions,
  • answer essay assignments associated with most topics
  • comment the answers of peers in some of the topics

Assessment scale: Pass-Fail.

Teacher: FT Marika Enwald

The maximum number of students is 30. Selection method is draw.

 

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
1-Feb-2019 – 30-Mar-2019
Periods: III
Language of instruction: English

Learning outcomes:

The participants understand that the “goodness” in good scientific practices has epistemic, moral, and social dimensions. They are familiar with Responsible conduct of research and Ethical principles of research in the humanities and social and behavioral sciences (The Finnish Advisory Board on Research Integrity) as well as The European code of conduct for research integrity. They are prepared to discuss ethical questions in their own research projects as well as the epistemic, moral, and social responsibilities of researchers.

General description:

The course explains the epistemic, moral, and social justification for the principles of research ethics. It describes how ethical standards should guide data collection and management, scientific reasoning, social practices of scientific communities, management of research groups, the treatment of animal and human subjects in research, and the relations between researchers and the public.

Course content:

-          The reward system of science: tensions between researchers’ non-epistemic goals (e.g., career advancement) and the epistemic goals of science

-          Scientific misconduct, recklessness and gross negligence, and questionable research practices

-          Objectivity and the proper role of epistemic, moral, and social values in scientific inquiry

-          Scientific communities, research groups and co-authorship

-          Trust in/within science and conflicts of interest

-          Ethical standards in data collection and management

-          Good practices in supervision, funding application, manuscript submission and peer review

Course schedule:

1. Lectures (12 h)

  • 3 x 4h

2. Independent study (Open Learning Research Ethics)

3. Workshop (2 groups) (12 h per group)

  • 2 x 6h

Lectures (time and place):

Tue 5.2. at 12-16 in Room C8 (Main building)
Tue 12.2. at 12-16 in Room Pinni B 3116
Tue 19.2. at 12-16 in Room Pinni B 1100 (NB! changed Room!)

Workshops (time and place):

Tue 5.3. at 10-16  in Room C8 (Main building)
Tue 12.3. at 10-16  in Room C8 (Main building)

Target audience:

Doctoral researchers in all disciplines and specialties

Enrolment in NettiOpsu. Maximum group size 20. Priority is given to English language doctoral researchers. Otherwise selection method is draw.

Requirements:

1. Pre-course assignment (1-2 pages)

2. Active participation in lectures and workshops

3. Presentation in the workshop (15-20 min)

4. Final essay (6-7 pages)

Pre-course assignment:

Read David Resnik’s (2015) article and write an essay (1-2 pages). Discuss at least three ethical principles mentioned by Resnik. Explain why these principles are important in your own research project or in your discipline/specialty. How are they relevant to research ethical questions or challenges you have met while you have been engaged in your research? Be sure to mention your name, discipline, research topic, and research group/collaboration (if applicable). The assignment is submitted via Moodle.

Resnik, David. 2015. What is Ethics in Research & Why is it Important?

https://www.niehs.nih.gov/research/resources/bioethics/whatis/index.cfm 

Teacher:

Marko Ahteensuu, University Lecturer in Research Ethics

Evaluation:

Pass/fail

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
5-Feb-2019 – 12-Mar-2019
Periods: III
Language of instruction: English

Learning outcomes
The focus of the course is on the acquisition of the skill of discerning and evaluating arguments found in scientific (or more broadly, academic) texts. The aim of the course is to provide students with analytic tools that enable and facilitate the construction and assessment of justifications for hypotheses and theories. On completing the course, the students will have a strong working grasp of different types of arguments, their interplay and the fallacies related to them.  On a more general level, the students will gain an appreciation of the nature and role of rational, intersubjective justification of claims as part of scientific inquiry.

Course contents
1. Justification: Assertions and grounds
2. Argumentation as a form of justification: types of arguments, types of fallacies
3. Deductive reasoning and its uses in justification
4. Observation, data, statistical inference: inductive reasoning and its uses in justification
5. Causal and hypothetical inference
6. Theoretical virtues and justification

Course schedule (please note changed dates!)

8.3.2019 at 10-16 o'clock in Pinni B4113

15.3.2019 at 10-16 o'clock in Pinni B4113

22.3.2019 at 10-16 o'clock in Pinni B4113

29.3.2019 at 10-16 o'clock in Pinni B4113

Teacher: PhD Antti Keskinen

Evaluation criteria
The course work consists of lectures, discussions and exercises. As the aim of the course is the acquisition of a practical skill of assessing arguments, special emphasis will be put on discussion and exercises. Passing the course requires active participation, and the production of a short essay (appr. 5 pages) in which the student applies the skills acquired during the course to her/his own research topic.

Evaluation
Pass/fail

Enrolment in NettiOpsu. Maximum group size 40. Selection method is draw.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
8-Mar-2019 – 29-Mar-2019
Periods: III
Language of instruction: English

General description: This course will give you practical tips and strategies for writing scientific articles in English. Designed as a two-day workshop, the main objective of this course is to learn to identify and produce the most important elements in English academic writing.

The first day offers a series of exercises and points to ponder, whereas the second day offers the students an opportunity to apply these tips and strategies in an "Editing Clinic". During the second day, the students will be taught a ten-step editing process that they will apply to texts in class.

Contents:

Day 1

group 1: 17.1.2019 at 9-16 o'clock, in room C6 Main building

group 2: 24.1.2019 at 9-16 o'clock, in room A4 Main building

9:15-9:45 Online sources: Scientific, clear, transparent
9:45-11:00 Drafting, Differences between Finnish and Anglo-American traditions
11:00-11:30  Components of a Scientific Article, The Sequence of Writing
11:30 Lunch
12:15 Problems, Transitions, Tenses
14:00 Coffee break
14:15 Old Information and New Information, Nouns and Verbs for Academic Writing
15:30 Self-editing
16:00 End of the day

Scientific Writing: The "Editing Clinic": Revising English Texts

Day 2: 31.1.2019 at 9-16 o'clock (both groups), in room A4 Main building

The students select a scientific text from their field and also bring in two to three pages of their own writing (5 copies of these pages). These texts will be evaluated in class.

9:15-10:30 Introduction to editing. Practice of editing on the "ideal" article in your field
10:30-10:40 Short break
10:40-11:30 Editing
11:30-12:10 Lunch  (40 min.)
12:10-14:00 Editing groups
14:00-14:20 Coffee break (20 min.)
14:20-15:25  Editing Groups
15:25-16:00  Course Discussions (Questions and Answers)
16:00   End of the course

Teacher: Lecturer Kathleen Moore

The maximum number of students is 18 in both groups. Selection method is draw. The student has to check the selection from NettiOpsu after the enrolment period.

Evaluation: Pass/fail.

Study materials: Booklet handed out by the instructor.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
17-Jan-2019 – 31-Jan-2019
Periods: III
Language of instruction: English

Learning Objectives

On completion of the course, successful participants will be able to:

  • recognize and apply the rhetorical conventions of academic discourse (i.e., argumentation, cohesion);
  • identify and employ features of academic grammar in their own writing (i.e., register, tense, voice);
  • analyze academic texts to assess the relevancy of research writing both within and outside their own field;
  • demonstrate their professional responsibility by engaging in peer-review;
  • understand the expectations of their target audience to tailor their own research articles for specific contexts;
  • and display competence in meeting the basic professional and academic expectations of researchers.

Contents

This multidisciplinary course offers doctoral students the opportunity to improve their writing for research skills. One focus of the course aims to familiarize students with the rhetorical conventions of academic discourse, including style, structure, and grammar. Students will apply these skills to their own field-specific discipline—and also outside of it—with the aim of developing their academic fluency through the critical assessment of texts.

A second focus of this course is the development of a writing project, where students will assess their own writing (a research article or dissertation chapter, for example) and their colleagues’ writing, as well. Central to this course is the effective communication of new knowledge created during the PhD (and beyond it). As it will help you to plan, begin, and/or continue your doctoral research project, this course therefore functions to facilitate your attempt to contribute to your research field.  

Writing for Research is taught as a partly-online course with both face-to-face and online interaction. To attain the intended learning outcomes, students will take an active participatory role in classes. Thus, to pass the course, students must attend all classes and complete all online and class task.

Target group

The course is intended for post-graduate students who feel that they need support in writing and reading research in English.

Proficiency level

B2=>C1 (European framework)

Pre-task, contact classes, online work, and independent assignments.

Schedule and place:

25.4.2019 at 12.00-16.00 in room Pinni B4125, continues online
Topic: Academic style and structure

9.5.2019 at 12.00-16.00 in room Pinni B4115, continues online
Topic: Academic argumentation

16.5.2019 at 12.00-16.00 in room Pinni B4115, continues online
Topic: Peer review for style, structure, and argumentation in writing groups

Teacher: Christine Horton

Student selection

At the maximum 20 students group. Selection method is draw. The student has to check the selection from NettiOpsu after the enrolment period.

Evaluation and evaluation criteria

Continuous self-assessment, peer assessment and assessment by the instructor. Pass/fail.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
25-Apr-2019 – 16-May-2019
Periods: III
Language of instruction: English

Learning outcomes: The aim of this course is to strengthen the transferable grant writing skills and increase the understanding on these skills as part of researcher’s  career. The course will give practical tips and strategies for grant writing. The course is directed at doctoral researchers at the beginning phase of their studies.

After completing the course, you will

  • know basic strategic principles, how to strengthen your skills in grant writing in the academic context,
  • understand the research funding system, especially in Finland,
  • be able to identify different types of research funding opportunities for your doctoral research,
  • recognize main relevant research funding foundations in your research field,
  • be able to clarify the impact and implementation of your research from the research funding agency point of view,
  • be able to improve  your grant proposal abstract from the research funding agency point of view,
  • be able to strengthen your research networking, which will also support your grant writing skills,
  • understand better the position of mobility as the part of research grant proposal, 
  • be able to make the draft budget of your research activities for the foundation.

 

Contents:

Part 1 - The ground for the grant writing

Part 2 - The funding sources (esp. foundations)

Part 3 – How to improve the description of impact and implementation of the research?

Part 4 – The features of good abstract of the grant proposal

Part 5 - Mobility and networking

 

Modes of study:

There’s two possibilities in studying this course. Online learning material will be used in both options.

Option 1) Online course, together with 3 hours introduction lectures (1 ECTS);

Option 2) Online course, together with 11 hours of contact teaching (2 ECTS).

In both options, the participants are expected to take part in introductory lecture and complete the exercises via Moodle on time by utilizing the course materials present on the platform. The exercises include short essays, comments and quizzes.

Group size:

Option 1) online course together with 3 hours introduction available for all (introductory lecture and online course is in English language)

Option 2) online course plus contact teaching (3 hours introduction, 8 hours teaching) for 20 persons (contact teaching in spring 2019 will be held in English language)

Teaching schedule:

Lecture 20.2.2019 at 13-16 in Pinni B1100  (NB! Changed Room!)

Each of the five online course modules will last from one to two weeks.

Contact teaching times for option 2):

Fri 8.3., Thu 14.3., Fri 22.3., Fri 29.3.2019 at 14-16 in Pinni B4116

Enrolment: Via Nettiopsu

Evaluation: Pass/fail

Evaluation criteria: Active participation in web-based working and exercises done on time.

More information: virve.kallioniemi-chambers (at) uta.fi

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
20-Feb-2019 – 29-Mar-2019
Periods: III
Language of instruction: English

The Speakers Series is a series of Studia Generalia Lectures in the Study of Society organized every other week by the University of Tampere Institute for Advanced Social Research (IASR) in cooperation with the New Social Research Programme (NSR). The lectures are given by the Research Fellows as well as the distinguished guests of the IASR and the NSR. For the programme, please check the IASR website www.uta.fi/iasr/lectures/.

Most doctoral students can also get 2 ECTS for attending a minimum of six IASR Lectures, altogether 6 ECTS at the maximum. These 2 ECTS for attending 6 lectures can be earned during two successive terms.

What is the IASR? – The Institute for Advanced Social Research, IASR) is the research collegium of the University of Tampere. It grants annually one- or two-year research positions for Professorial Fellows, Senior Research Fellows and Postdoctoral Research Fellows studying society to promote high-level multidisciplinary research and international interaction in the university.

Responsible teacher: Dr. Risto Heiskala

No pre-registration.

Periods: III IV
Language of instruction: English

The course focuses on the basic and general features of scientific research, methodology, and argumentation, as applicable to any field of study. Some central themes in the philosophy of science will also be discussed, in an introductory manner.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
11-Jan-2019 – 1-Mar-2019
Periods: III
Language of instruction: English
Further information:

The course is intended to all new international UTA Master’s degree students, but it will serve also international Doctoral students. Other degree and exchange students may join if there are free places.

Contact person: Coordinator of international education, Anna Wansén-Kaseva

The studies are primarily targeted at professors, teachers, researchers, supervisors and doctoral students working at the Tampere University.

Enrolment for University Studies

The intake is 30 participants and the selection will be made based on the applications. In order to be selected, the applicant has to have a working contract to the Tampere new University (UTA/TUT), or one has to be a doctoral student in the university.

Application form is found on the webpage
http://www.uta.fi/edu/yliopistopedagogiikka/ajankohtaista.html

Teaching
10-Jan-2019 – 17-May-2019
Periods: III IV
Language of instruction: English
Further information:

Priority is given to those who teach, to tenure track personnel, who have agreed with their supervisors / heads of units to participate, and who do not have prior pedagogical training. The application process also emphasises having participants from different faculties and departments, applicant's motivation and ability to commit to the studies.

Learning outcomes

Students will understand the current job market prospects for PhD researchers in Finland and will be able to express more in details their strengths, skills and values in the job application process, and have examples they can use in job applications.

They will know strategies to find possible job openings and contact employers and have a job hunting plan with concrete actions to take.  They will understand the concept of transferable skills, have an overview of their own skills and network and know how to talk about their skills to non-academic employers. They will have prepared a CV that can be used outside of Academia and understand how to write a good motivation letter. They will understand how a job interview is conducted in Finland and understand how to prepare for the job interview. They will have practiced their interview skills.

General description

The aim of this course is to help Doctoral researchers develop a career perspective and to develop the necessary knowledge and skills needed for job hunting. The focus is on developing a broader perspective that extends also to outside of Academia (though not exclusively). The course fits for all Doctoral Researchers in all disciplines and does not require prior knowledge. It can be done in all stages of the PhD work and researchers are recommended not to wait until the last stage.

Working mode

The course uses blended learning. There are two afternoons of contact learning, one individual session and individual learning through a Moodle learning environment.

Contact teaching

-Wed 23.01.2019  from 12:15-16:00 (Room Linna K108)

-a 20 minute feedback session about students CV during week 6 or 7.

-Thu 14.02.2019 from 12:15-16:00,  (in Päätalo, Y-kampus, Room Y40), please note changed date!

Assessment

Scale: pass-fail.

Assessment criteria: active participation in both group meetings, approved completion of CV assignment and Job hunting plan, completion of the online tasks.

Course material

Material prepared and assigned by the teacher. The moodle environment will be used to distribute all material.

Enrolment:

Enrolment in nettiopsu.  This course is for all Doctoral researchers of the new Tampere University. There is a maximum of 20 participants. Selection method is draw.

Teacher

Mariska Roelofs, Career coach, TOHTOS project

Mariska.roelofs@tuni.fi

Teaching: 14.01.2019 – 15.02.2019

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
14-Jan-2019 – 15-Feb-2019
Periods: III
Language of instruction: English
Period (4-Mar-2019 - 26-May-2019)
Doctoral School [Period IV]

Learning outcomes:
After the course, students can apply both nonparametric statistical methods and basic parametric tests. Students can select and use an appropriate statistical methods for data analysing.

General description

This course is meant for students, who have pre-knowledge on the basics of statistics (eg. course Introduction to Statistics).

Course topics include: Understanding notations of statistics, different measurement scales, basic knowledge of statistics.
Nonparametric statistical methods, basic parametric statistical methods, and regression and correlations between parameters.
Presenting your data and results of statistical tests.

Course completion and assessment:
Completing the course requires active participation in lectures and approved project work. Lecture and project work materials will be delivered via Moodle.

Timetable

Mon 4.3. lecture 9-11 in Linna K108

Mon 11.3. lecture 9-11 in Pinni A3111

Mon 18.3. lecture 9-11 in Pinni A3111

Mon 25.3. lecture 9-11 in Pinni A3111 + computer classroom 11-12 (Pinni B1084)

Mon 1.4. lecture 9-11 in Pinni A3111 + computer classroom 11-12 (Pinni B1084)

Mon 8.4. lecture 9-11 in Pinni A3111 + computer classroom 11-12 (Pinni B1084)

Mon 15.4. lecture 9-11 in Pinni A3111 + computer classroom 11-12 (Pinni B1084)

Assessment scale: Pass - Fail

Enrollment: In Nettiopsu. The amount of participants will be limited according to available computer classroom places.

Litareture and readings:
- Lecture notes.
- Vimala Veeraraghavan, Suhas Shetgovekar: Textbook of Parametric and Nonparametric Statistics. SAGE Publications Ltd.
- Martin Bland: An Introduction to Medical Statistics. Oxford Medical Publications. 3rd edition.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
4-Mar-2019 – 15-Apr-2019
Periods: IV
Language of instruction: English

Learning outcomes

After the course, the participants:
-    understand the range of different types of ethnographic research
-    have knowledge of the ethnographic research process, including definitions of “the field” and situating oneself on the field,
-    understand the processes of analysing the data and reporting key results.

General description

Ethnographic research is popular in social sciences, social anthropology in particular. In addition, however, it is in wide use across disciplinary borders, for example in education and health sciences as well as when researching institutions and governance. Recently, Internet discussions and online groups have been studied using ethnographic methods.

Ethnographic approach is particularly useful when one wants a rich understanding of cultural processes and individuals’ roles as participants in these processes. The main method in ethnographic research is participant observation but researchers often also conduct interviews and collect material, textual and/or visual data. What sorts of research practice is ethnographic nowadays, as the method continues to evolve? When is it particularly useful? What kinds of research questions does the method provide answers to? What is the range and current variety of ethnography?

Seeking answers to these questions, the course also focuses on the everyday, practical side of conducting ethnographic research; how to solve challenges and how does the research process proceed?

The course consists of two days. Day one, consists of lectures on key themes; the epistemologies of ethnographic research, different types of ethnographic fields and the researcher’s position on the field. Day two includes a lecture on the analysis of ethnographic data and a seminar on students’ papers on their own ongoing/planned ethnographic research projects.

Completion mode

3-5 ECTS credit

-    3 ECTS: attending the lectures, reading the course materials and writing a reflective essay on the course (max. 2000 words).
-    5 ECTS: attending the lectures, reading the course materials, writing a paper on one’s own ethnographic research (max. 3000 words) & presenting it in a seminar group and commenting on other students’ papers.

When signing into the course, those who hope to do 5 ECTS must write a summary of 200-300 words where they explain their own ethnographic research project: research questions, fieldwork and the current phase.

Group size

30 students of which 10 will be able get the 5 ECTS.

Course schedule

Tue 9.4.2019, room C8 Main building
9.15-9.30     Welcome and introduction to the course.
9.30-10.00     Mari Korpela: Ethnography: what, where, when and how?
10.00-10.45     Mari Korpela: The researcher’s many roles on the field
10.45-11.15     Discussion
11.15-11.30 a break
11.30-12.30 Anna Haverinen:  Practicing online ethnography  
12.30-13.30     lunch break
13.30-14.30     Riikka Homanen : Institutional ethnography
14.30-15.30     Mari Korpela: Ethnographic research among children and participatory research
15.30-16.00     Discussion

Wed 24.4.2019, room A32 Main building

9.15-10.30     Mari Korpela: Help! What shall I do now? Organising and analysing ethnographic
 data
10.45-12.30     Workshop on course readings
12.30-13.15     Lunch
13.15-16.00     Students’ papers

In between the course days, students will have time to reflect on the lectures and readings in their own papers, and that they will have time to read each others’ papers.

PLEASE NOTE: Those wishing to get 5 ECTS must use ethnographic approach in their own research project.  It is recommended that they are either currently conducting fieldwork or have already finished with the fieldwork.



Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
9-Apr-2019 – 24-Apr-2019
Periods: IV
Language of instruction: English

The Speakers Series is a series of Studia Generalia Lectures in the Study of Society organized every other week by the University of Tampere Institute for Advanced Social Research (IASR) in cooperation with the New Social Research Programme (NSR). The lectures are given by the Research Fellows as well as the distinguished guests of the IASR and the NSR. For the programme, please check the IASR website www.uta.fi/iasr/lectures/.

Most doctoral students can also get 2 ECTS for attending a minimum of six IASR Lectures, altogether 6 ECTS at the maximum. These 2 ECTS for attending 6 lectures can be earned during two successive terms.

What is the IASR? – The Institute for Advanced Social Research, IASR) is the research collegium of the University of Tampere. It grants annually one- or two-year research positions for Professorial Fellows, Senior Research Fellows and Postdoctoral Research Fellows studying society to promote high-level multidisciplinary research and international interaction in the university.

Responsible teacher: Dr. Risto Heiskala

No pre-registration.

Periods: III IV
Language of instruction: English

Learning outcomes: Students get familiar with various aspects of scientific communication.


Lecture hall: Arvo-building F114, 1st floor

All our lectures begin at 15.15

Programme:


Wed 6.3.2019
15.15-15.30 Opening the course, Kalle Kurppa
15.30-16.15 Writing a scientific article from biomedical research, Kalle Kurppa
   

Wed 13.3.2019
15.15- 16.30 Science communications, Laura Tohka
16.45- 18.00 Scientific lectures, congress abstracts and posters, Kalle Kurppa

Tue 19.3.2019
15.15-16.15 Statistical reporting, Heini Huhtala        
16.30-17.45 Tables and statistical graphics, Raili Salmelin

Wed 27.3.2019
15.15- 16.45 The role of the editor in Scientific publishing, Timo Partonen

Wed 3.4.2019
15.15- 16.00 Research article publishing: open access, Sari Leppänen
16.15- 18.00 Producing better English text, Robert Hollingsworth

Wed 17.4.2019
15.15- 16.00 My career and doctoral thesis
16.15- 17.00 Doctoral dissertation- practical aspects, Kalle Kurppa

Responsible teacher: Kalle Kurppa

Participants: Open to all. Especially recommended for doctoral researchers and students enrolled on the Tampere Research Training Program for Medical Students.

Evaluation: Pass/fail. Students write a learning diary on the basis of lectures.

Enrolment open 4.2. - 24.2.2019: Students are required to enrol the course with e-form: https://elomake3.uta.fi/lomakkeet/7859/lomake.html

Teaching
6-Mar-2019 – 17-Apr-2019
Periods: IV
Language of instruction: English

Learning outcomes: This course provides doctoral researchers with understanding over writing scientific journal articles. The lecture will motivate students to start writing sooner. After the lecture the student will understand what is required from a scientific article and what the related publishing processes entail. The student will know how to approach and write a scientific journal article effectively.

The lecture aims at providing tips to researchers in all fields. Especially starting researchers have experienced the lecture and workshop as very beneficial.

Contents: The course consists of

  • lecture  at 12-16 (4 hours)
  • pre-assignment
  • seminar work (group 1) or (group 2) at 9-16 o'clock

All students should take part in the lecture and the workshop.

Lecture on 21.5.2019 at 12-16 o'clock in roomLinna K103

Contents:
 - Practical tips for writing scientific articles
 - Improving chances for acceptance
 - Article logic, beginning and end
 - Editor's viewpoints
 - Group dynamics for writing articles
 - Discussion

Seminar

group 1 on 22.5.2019 at 9-16 o'clock in room Pinni B4117

OR

group 2 on 23.5.2019 9-16 o'clock in room Pinni B4117

Seminar will deepen issues discussed on the lecture.

Reference material: Tips for writing scientific journal articles

Pre-meeting assignment:

•             Read the guidebook "Tips for writing scientific journal articles" (http://herkules.oulu.fi/isbn9789514293801/isbn9789514293801.pdf). Choose a potential target journal where you wish to publish in the future. Analyse the structure, not substance, of 2-3 articles recently published in this journal by comparing them against the structure presented in the guidebook. If the structure in the target journal is different, please describe it. Write a report in text format (e.g. MSWord) of your observations, pay attention to any deviations in structure. 

•             Prepare a short presentation of your observations, for instance, using 3-4 PowerPoint slides. This presentation will be publicly shown in the workshop.
•             In the report, include your reflections about the issues you consider as bottlenecks in your scientific writing. These will be discussed in the workshop anonymously.
•             In the report, include the topics you wish to be discussed during the workshop
•             Please, remember to include your name, academic field, and your research topic

Pre-meeting assignment to be sent to course Moodle-area (Moodle area address to be informed to students).

Lecturer: Dr Pekka Belt

More information about the lecturer: www.tinyurl.com/efficient-doctoral-studies

Enrolment: Enrolment in NettiOpsu either to group 1 or 2. The selection method is draw. The student has to check the selection from NettiOpsu after the enrolment period. Maximum 18 students per seminar group can be accepted.

Evaluation: Pass/fail.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
21-May-2019 – 23-May-2019
Periods: IV
Language of instruction: English

Goals:

1. To begin, proceed, digress, summarize and end a presentation, and to respond to questions in an effective manner
2. To convert written into spoken English: stylistic differences
3. To practice correct pronunciation and intonation
4. To deliver a talk in a relaxed manner using effective visual aids, but without reading
5. To analyze one's own presentation and (in groups) others' presentations in a supportive, affirmative manner, including attention to body language and visual aids.

Contents:

Day 1 (common to both groups): 7.3.2019 in room Pinni B 3117

9:15-10:30 Structure of English presentations; Introduction and Conclusions-tips
10:30-10:45 Break
10:45-11:30 Language performance issues
11:30-12:10 Lunch
12:10-14:00 Preparing and Using Visuals: Tips and Concerns
14:00-14:20 Coffee
14:20-16:00 Training for the Question-and-Answer period at conferences

Day 2

group 1: 21.3.2019 in room Pinni B0039

group 2: 28.3.2019 in room Pinni B0039

9:15-10:30 Individual Presentations + Judges feedback and evaluation
10:30-10:45 Break
10:45-11:30 Individual Presentations + Judges feedback and evaluation
11:30-12:10 Lunch
12:10-14:00 Individual Presentations + Judges feedback and evaluation
14:00-14:20 Coffee
14:20-16:00 Individual Presentations + Judges feedback and evaluation

Teacher: Lecturer Kathleen Moore

The maximum number of students is 10 in each group. The selection method is draw. The student has to check the selection from NettiOpsu after the enrolment period.

Evaluation: Pass/fail.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
7-Mar-2019 – 28-Mar-2019
Periods: IV
Language of instruction: English

Learning outcomes:

Goal of this online course is to get the participant acquainted with the processes of systematic information management within the participants’ own research work. After completing the course, the participant

  • will be able to seek and manage information efficiently
  • recognizes how metrics can be utilized in evaluating scientific visibility and impact
  • understands the open science principles in research publication and can assess scientific publication channels
  • knows the key principles of research data management

Student group: Doctoral researchers and researchers

Contents:
Module 1: Scientific literature retrieval
Module 2: Visibility and impact
Module 3: Research data management
Module 4: Open Access publishing

Organised by: Tampere University Library

People in charge: Tomi Toikko, Sari Leppänen, Saija Tapio

Teaching period:  4.3.2019 -. All modules will last for one week. 

Modes of study: Online course. The participant is expected to complete the weekly exercises on time by utilizing the course materials present on the platform. The exercises include short essays, quizzes and discussions with other participants.

Group size: No limit

Enrolment: Via Nettiopsu

Evaluation: Pass/fail

Evaluation criteria: Active participation in web-based working and exercises done on time.

More information: tomi.toikko at tuni.fi

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
4-Mar-2019 – 8-Apr-2019
Periods: IV
Language of instruction: English

General description

The managing of everyday life as a researcher requires a series of basic skills. These skills are seldom spelled out but have to do with the organization of information flows, time management, priority setting, the setting-up of a publication and conference presentation plan, the decoding of how peer-reviewed journals work (and what that means to our writing skills), communication skills for different occasions, conference presentation skills, people skills and networking skills.

Designed as a two-day course, this course will dedicate the first day to bringing attention to these basic skills through an interactive lecture, the taking of ‘tests’ to assist course participants in articulating their own personal goals as far as academic work is concerned, and discussions based on the reading that will be assigned beforehand.

The second day will focus on the two skills that sometimes take the longest to master and tend to eat up a considerable amount of our everyday lives: 1) the writing for peer-reviewed journals and 2) using of international conferences as network-building opportunities.

Learning outcomes:

-          To identify what each and every one of these academic basic skills are (and understand why all academics need to develop their own approach to improving them)

-          To guide participants in identifying where they are at skills-wise

-          To provide concrete examples of potential strategies that participants can use in order to improve their skills

-          To provide insight into how international peer-reviewed journals work and what this means to how we should write in order to manage being published in them

-          To provide insight into how international conferences work and what we can do to exploit the networking opportunities that they offer

-          To facilitate discussions amongst course participants so that experiences and expertise can be shared

Teaching time:

Tue 12.3. at 9-16 o'clock in room A2A (Main building)

and

Wed 13.3.2019 at 9-16 o'clock in Pinni B3111

Maximum group size: 25

PLEASE NOTE:

-          Attendance to, and active participation in the discussions and activities that will be carried out BOTH days is required for the completion of the course

-          All course participants are expected to send in a short (1 A4) text stating:

  • Name and field of research
  • Number of years in the doctoral program
  • Number of articles already published, if any (list # of co-authored and sole author publications separately)
  • Number of international conferences attended
  • Thesis format (i.e. article doctorate or monograph)
  • Reasons for participation (with concrete reference to the type of skills that you are most interested in improving)

Teacher: Prof. Sandra Torres (Uppsala University, Sweden)

www.soc.uu.se /// sandra.torres@soc.uu.se

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
12-Mar-2019 – 13-Mar-2019
Periods: IV
Language of instruction: English

Learning outcomes
After completing the course, the participants
- know the phases of the process of knowledge discovery (data prepocessing, data mining and postprocessing)
- know basic data mining tasks and methods
- are aware of possibilities of utilising data mining in different research fields

Description

In data mining, large quantities of data are explored and analysed by automatic and semi-automatic means to discover novel, interesting information. Data mining is an interdisciplinary field combining e.g. methods from computer sciences and statistics. It has wide, diverse application areas from education, social, business and administrative sciences to medical and life sciences.

Course contents
-    Lectures 10 h
-    Hands-on exercises with data mining tools 10 h
-    Reading research articles related to applications of data mining methods in participant’s own field and writing a short report
-    Giving a presentation on applications of data mining in participant’s own field (presentation session 3 h)

Teachers: Kati Iltanen, Martti Juhola, Henry Joutsijoki

Target group

The course is intended for post-graduate students who are interested in data mining. No computer sciences or statistics background is required.

Enrolment: At the maximum 15 students, minimum 10 students. Selection method is draw.

Teaching:

Lectures:

4.4. at 10-12 Pinni A2089 (Juhola)

11.4.  at 10-12 Pinni A2089 (Juhola)

24.4. at 10-12 Pinni A2088 (Iltanen)

3.5. at 10-12 Pinni A2089 (Joutsijoki)

10.5. at 10-12 Pinni A2089 (Joutsijoki)



Practices:

4.4. at 12-14 Pinni B1084 (Joutsijoki)

11.4. at 12-14 Virta computer classroom 53 (Joutsijoki)

24.4. at 12-14 Pinni B1084 (Iltanen)

3.5. at 12-14 Pinni B1084 (Joutsijoki)

10.5. at 12-14 Pinni B1084 (Joutsijoki)



Presentation session

17.5. at 10-13 Pinni A2089




Evaluation: Pass/fail

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
4-Apr-2019 – 17-May-2019
Periods: IV
Language of instruction: English

Learning outcomes: The student learns about the PhD by publication guidelines of their respective faculty and understands how the formats of and expectations toward the integrative chapter vary across disciplines. The student understands the purpose of the integrative chapter and develops an outline of his/her integrative chapter, bearing in mind its core task to a) construct a meaningful connection between the individual articles and b) define the overall analytical contribution of the PhD thesis.

Description:

A PhD by publication usually consists of a set of papers published in peer-reviewed academic journals or edited volumes, and an integrating chapter. While this format of PhD completion is gaining in prominence, the genre of the integrative chapter still varies greatly across disciplines. The amount and quality of support provided by faculties and supervisors are in many cases inadequate (Nikander & Piattoeva 2017).

In this 2-day course we discuss the integrative chapter as a meta narrative that not only reiterates the theoretical and methodological choices, and the empirical results, reported in the individual papers, but also, and more importantly, builds a narrative that explains how the individual papers link to each other and how they address the research objectives of the entire PhD. The task of the integrative chapter is thus to enable the doctoral student to distance from the individual publications to, first, consider and clarify their specific roles and contributions and, second, to develop the argument that connects all of the individual publications into a coherent whole.

The course consists of a lecture, two course assignments (first before Day 1 and second in between the meetings), and two seminar meetings. The lecture discusses the purpose of the integrative chapter and provides practical tips on various aspects of the writing process. The seminars and course assignments offer hands-on possibilities to exchange knowledge and experiences across disciplines, and develop and discuss the preliminary outline of one’s integrative chapter.

This course is intended for PhD students across disciplines who have started - or are about to start - writing their integrative chapter.

Dates: 10.5. & 28.5.2019, at 12-16 o’clock

Place: Pinni B4113

Enrolment through Nettiopsu. Max number of participants 30. Priority is given to those who have started - or are about to start - writing their integrative chapter. Otherwise selection method is draw.

Teacher: Nelli Piattoeva, New Social Research programme

Structure: pre-course assignment; lecture 2h+seminar 2h (Day 1); course assignment (to be given at the lecture); seminar 4h (Day 2).

Pre-course assignment (summarize your answers/reflections in writing, approx. 1p.). Deadline 3.5.2019 (return through course Moodle)

1)    Read the PhD by publication guidelines of your faculty, including guidelines for the integrative chapter (if available). Consider your current state of affairs in relation to the guidelines – have your fulfilled the formal requirements of the PhD by publication; consider the extent to which the existing guidelines are clear, or not, in helping your practical work on the integrative chapter. Which questions remain unanswered?

2)    Interview a colleague who has successfully defended a PhD by publication. Request tips by asking some of the following questions: What was the best (and the worst!) advice they received while working on/preparing for writing the integrative chapter; What was crucial in helping them start the writing process and develop the logic that brought the individual publications into a functional whole? Which moments were particularly difficult and what helped them to overcome the challenges? In hindsight, what other advice would they give to someone who is about to write their integrative chapter?

 

Course assignment (to be completed in the time between Day 1 and Day 2)

1)    Find 1 recent PhD by publication defended at your faculty or in your discipline at another university. Read the integrative chapter and reflect on how the author explains the individual contributions of the publications, and the overall contribution of the PhD built on the individual texts. Does the integrative chapter succeed in constructing a successful connecting narrative? What particular strategies are especially fruitful for the task? If the integrative chapter is not convincing – what made you come to this conclusion, what could have been done differently, in your opinion?

2)    Prepare an outline of your integrative chapter in the following manner. Table of contents and, in about two paragraphs a) define the overall analytical contribution of the PhD thesis. b) describe how the individual articles address the contribution and connect to one another.

 

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
10-May-2019 – 28-May-2019
Periods: IV
Language of instruction: English

The studies are primarily targeted at professors, teachers, researchers, supervisors and doctoral students working at the Tampere University.

Enrolment for University Studies

The intake is 30 participants and the selection will be made based on the applications. In order to be selected, the applicant has to have a working contract to the Tampere new University (UTA/TUT), or one has to be a doctoral student in the university.

Application form is found on the webpage
http://www.uta.fi/edu/yliopistopedagogiikka/ajankohtaista.html

Teaching
10-Jan-2019 – 17-May-2019
Periods: III IV
Language of instruction: English
Further information:

Priority is given to those who teach, to tenure track personnel, who have agreed with their supervisors / heads of units to participate, and who do not have prior pedagogical training. The application process also emphasises having participants from different faculties and departments, applicant's motivation and ability to commit to the studies.

This course will give a detailed overview of statistical models for modern regression and classification with emphasis on applications. A number of examples and case studies will be examined. This course will cover a range of models from linear regression through various classes of more flexible models including fully nonparametric regression models. We will consider both regression and classification problems. Methods such as splines, additive models, multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS), neural networks, classification and regression trees (CART), linear and flexible discriminant analysis, generalized additive models, nearest- neighbor rules and learning vector quantization will be discussed.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
8-Apr-2019 – 17-May-2019
Periods: IV
Language of instruction: English
Further information:

Recommended preceding studies:

Basic courses of statistics and Regression analysis.

Please note

Students who have completed course MTTA2 Ei-parametrinen regressio can not get full credits of this course because some of the contents overlap.