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Archived teaching schedules 2016–2017
You are browsing archived teaching schedule. Current teaching schedules can be found here.
Master's Degree Programme in Public Choice

Periods

Period I (29-Aug-2016 – 23-Oct-2016)
Period II (24-Oct-2016 – 16-Dec-2016)
Period III (9-Jan-2017 – 5-Mar-2017)
Period IV (6-Mar-2017 – 28-May-2017)
Period (29-Aug-2016 - 23-Oct-2016)
General Studies [Period I]

This course introduces students to the testing of causal hypotheses with statistical methods, focusing on social-science applications.  Causal inference in this setting requires melding the language of mathematical statistics with the reality of human decision-making.  Successfully testing a social-science hypothesis thus requires both facility with the mathematics, as well an understanding of how people actually behave.  This course gives students an introduction to the math, and experience in translating the math to reality.

The course is timed according to the scripted schedule of the masters’ program in Public Choice, and is tailored to the needs of that program.  As a result, non-PCP students should be aware that the course will proceed at a substantially faster pace than other courses.

The first week is the program’s Math Camp, consisting of 10 lecture hours (no quarters) and nightly group homework assignments.  The following three weeks form the Statistics component, consisting of 24 lecture hours (no quarters), twice-a-week group homework assignments, and a final exam.  The final mark comes from the Statistics component alone: 50% weight on homework, and 50% on the exam.

 

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
5-Sep-2016 – 27-Sep-2016
Periods: I
Language of instruction: English
Further information:

Course in North American Studies: NAM-VII Methodology

Enrolment for University Studies

In cases where more students register for a course than space allows, priority is assigned as follows:

1. First priority is given to the degree students of the University of Tampere
2. Second priority is given to the exchange students of the University of Tampere
3. Third priority is given to the Tampere3 students and to the high school students of the UTA Teacher Training School

Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
29-Aug-2016 – 14-Oct-2016
Periods: I
Language of instruction: English
Studies on Global Society [Period I]

The course provides students with the basis for making sense of globalization and transnational connections in the contemporary world. National policies and cultures are increasingly and obviously related to events and forces outside national borders. Policies, politics, cultural trends and organizations are now intimately and broadly inter-connected across the world. The course will depart from the view of nations as container societies, and build a basis for students to gain a critical understanding of transnational connections. Students will learn of the variety of perspectives on understanding the contemporary world as divided into comparable nation-states. Students will also be guided on theoretical frameworks to understand: global history, global economy, European politics, national policies in the modern world society, media interactions with global and national politics, and global culture. 

Please note that unlike mentioned in the curriculum of the GTS programme, students are required to complete full 10 ECTS credits (lectures + seminar) on this course. It is not possible to participate only the lecture part.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
7-Sep-2016 – 10-Nov-2016
Periods: I II
Language of instruction: English
Further information:

In order to be able to participate the course, students are required to complete both lectures and the seminar (10 ECTS).

Please note that you must enroll separately for the lectures and the seminar.

Students will be accepted to the course in the following order:

1. degree students of the MDP Global and Transnational Studies

2. degree students of the other Global Society programmes (MDP in in Peace, Mediation and Conflict Research, MDP in Quantitative Social Research, MDP in Comparative Social Policy and Welfare)

3. other degree students of UTA

4. exchange students

The course deepens the students’ understanding of the functioning of world society and the role of epistemic governance in it. In addition to showing how world culture is seen in the global spread of world models, the course approaches the circulation of global ideas from the perspective of national actors, especially policymakers. In the national political fields, actors justify new policies by international comparisons and by the successes and failures of models adopted in other countries. Consequently, national policies are synchronized with each other. Yet, because of the way such domestication of global trends takes place, citizens retain and reproduce the understanding that they follow a sovereign national trajectory.
The lectures introduce the key ideas of the Stanford School of New Institutionalism coupled with Foucault-inspired governmentality approach and the advances made in discursive institutionalist research. Through required reading the students will get a holistic view on neoinstitutionalist global sociology.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
10-Oct-2016 – 16-Dec-2016
Periods: I II
Language of instruction: English
Further information:

In order to complete the course, students are required to participate both the lectures and the seminar.

Maximum 20 students are accepted to the course in the following order:

1. degree students of the MDP in Global and Transnational Studies

2. degree students of the other Global Society programmes (MDP in Peace, Mediation and Conflict Research, MDP in Quantitative Social Research, MDP in Comparative Social Policy and Welfare)

3. other degree students of UTA

4. exchange students

Advanced Studies [Period I]

The course includes 10 hour lecture series by a visiting Professor Roderick Kiewiet from California Institute of Technology:

  1. Externalities 1:  Contagious Disease and Public Health Regulation
  2. Externalities 2: Labor Markets: Working Conditions and Child Labor Laws
  3. Externalities 3: Air Pollution: Command and Control vs. Market-based Regulation
  4. Monopolies:  Telecommunications and the Airline Industries
  5. Democracy and Discount Rates: The Crisis in Social Security and Public Employee Pensions

 

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
5-Sep-2016 – 21-Nov-2016
Periods: I II
Language of instruction: English

This course is part of the Master's programme in Public Choice and is compulsory for the degree students in the programme.

There are some places available for other students at the University of Tampere.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
30-Aug-2016 – 29-Nov-2016
Periods: I II
Language of instruction: English
Further information:

-----------------------------------------------------------------

In North American Studies belongs to NAM-VII Methodology.

The course examines the consequences of democratic and dictatorial regimes in

a comparative perspective. We will explore how these broad types of regimes

are defined in the literature, how they structure political participation by citizens,

how they change over time and as a result from demands from the people, and

what effects regimes have on relative performance. In addition we'll work with

comparative public opinion datasets commonly used in social science research.

Class meetings: The class will meet once a week. Students should complete

the reading assigned in the syllabus and the homework before each meeting.

Each class period will be devoted to a discussion of the main ideas encountered

in the reading and students are expected to fully participate in the discussions.

Term Papers: 2 term papers will be assigned – one critical review and a final

paper. Both will incorporate the concepts studied in the class. Think of each

paper as an exam – I do. Make sure that you use them to show what you have

learned from the readings and lectures. The final paper is due on the last day of

class.

Critical Review Essay: Semester participants will write 1 paper on any of

the topics covered in this class. These papers are not supposed to be mere

summaries of the readings. Rather, they should be thoughtful critiques of the

assigned readings.

Research Paper: Each seminar participant will prepare a final paper.

Ideally this paper will be an empirical analysis using data from the World Values

Survey (http://www.worldvaluessurvey.org/wvs.jsp) or the European Values Study

(http://www.europeanvaluesstudy.eu/) datasets. The topic of this paper is up to

you. Alternatively, students can write a literature review of a topic addressed in

this class (see the Gandhi and Lust-Okar article for an example).

Schedule

Week 1 (Sept 7) Course Introduction
Week 2 (Sept. 14) Summarizing Regime Types
Week 3 (Sept. 21) Measuring Regime Characteristics
Week 4 (Sept 22) Value Change and Postmaterialism
Week 5 (Oct. 12) Political Life in Democracies
Week 6 (Oct. 26) Political Participation in Authoritarian Systems
Week 7 (Nov. 2) Civil Society [Will meet in Pinni B 4113]
Week 8 (Nov. 9) Social Welfare
Week 9 (Nov. 16) Economic Performance
Week 10 (Nov. 23) Corruption
Week 11 (Nov. 30) Protection of Human Rights and Personal Integrity
Week 12 (Dec. 7) War and Regime Type
Week 13 (Dec. 14) Prospects for Democratic Transitions

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
7-Sep-2016 – 7-Dec-2016
Periods: I II
Language of instruction: English
Further information:

Students will be accepted to the course in the following order:

1. degree students of the MDP in Public Choice

2. degree students of the other Global Society programmes (MDP in Peace, Mediation and Conflict Research, MDP in Global and Transnational Studies, MDP in Comparative Social Policy and Welfare)

3. other degree students of UTA

4. exchange students

---------------------------------------

The course can also be taken within the Degree Programme in Politics,

when it will compensate 5 ECTS from one of the following Political

Science study units: POLVOS23 Civil Society and Political Participation

(https://www10.uta.fi/opas/opintojakso.htm?rid=9428&idx=2&uiLang=en&lang=en&lvv=2015),

or POLVOS27 Political Systems

(https://www10.uta.fi/opas/opintojakso.htm?rid=9428&idx=6&uiLang=en&lang=en&lvv=2015).

Period (24-Oct-2016 - 16-Dec-2016)
General Studies [Period II]
Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
24-Oct-2016 – 15-Dec-2016
Periods: II III
Language of instruction: English
Further information:

This module is made up of class sessions including group work (20 hours), as well as independent out of class tasks (61 hours). The module will be two periods long.

Studies on Global Society [Period II]

The course provides students with the basis for making sense of globalization and transnational connections in the contemporary world. National policies and cultures are increasingly and obviously related to events and forces outside national borders. Policies, politics, cultural trends and organizations are now intimately and broadly inter-connected across the world. The course will depart from the view of nations as container societies, and build a basis for students to gain a critical understanding of transnational connections. Students will learn of the variety of perspectives on understanding the contemporary world as divided into comparable nation-states. Students will also be guided on theoretical frameworks to understand: global history, global economy, European politics, national policies in the modern world society, media interactions with global and national politics, and global culture. 

Please note that unlike mentioned in the curriculum of the GTS programme, students are required to complete full 10 ECTS credits (lectures + seminar) on this course. It is not possible to participate only the lecture part.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
7-Sep-2016 – 10-Nov-2016
Periods: I II
Language of instruction: English
Further information:

In order to be able to participate the course, students are required to complete both lectures and the seminar (10 ECTS).

Please note that you must enroll separately for the lectures and the seminar.

Students will be accepted to the course in the following order:

1. degree students of the MDP Global and Transnational Studies

2. degree students of the other Global Society programmes (MDP in in Peace, Mediation and Conflict Research, MDP in Quantitative Social Research, MDP in Comparative Social Policy and Welfare)

3. other degree students of UTA

4. exchange students

The course deepens the students’ understanding of the functioning of world society and the role of epistemic governance in it. In addition to showing how world culture is seen in the global spread of world models, the course approaches the circulation of global ideas from the perspective of national actors, especially policymakers. In the national political fields, actors justify new policies by international comparisons and by the successes and failures of models adopted in other countries. Consequently, national policies are synchronized with each other. Yet, because of the way such domestication of global trends takes place, citizens retain and reproduce the understanding that they follow a sovereign national trajectory.
The lectures introduce the key ideas of the Stanford School of New Institutionalism coupled with Foucault-inspired governmentality approach and the advances made in discursive institutionalist research. Through required reading the students will get a holistic view on neoinstitutionalist global sociology.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
10-Oct-2016 – 16-Dec-2016
Periods: I II
Language of instruction: English
Further information:

In order to complete the course, students are required to participate both the lectures and the seminar.

Maximum 20 students are accepted to the course in the following order:

1. degree students of the MDP in Global and Transnational Studies

2. degree students of the other Global Society programmes (MDP in Peace, Mediation and Conflict Research, MDP in Quantitative Social Research, MDP in Comparative Social Policy and Welfare)

3. other degree students of UTA

4. exchange students

he idea of granting each citizen an individual and unconditional regular income without any means test of work requirement has gained my prominence across Europe (and beyond) in the last decade. In June the Swiss will vote on a referendum to institute a basic income. Basic income features prominently in public debates across Europe and several parties have adopted it in their respective election programs. The Netherlands and of course Finland are in the process of starting a multi-year basic income experiment, while most recently France and Portugal are exploring the same idea. The purpose of this course is to offer students a thorough introduction about basic income as a social policy instrument. The course outlines the main characteristics of basic income and explores how it differs from traditional income support policies. In addition, the course provides a critical overview of the reasons for and against a basic income as well as reviewing a number of practical and political challenges that need to be overcome. Finally, the course offers a series of lectures that focus on basic income in the Finnish context, including an updated account of the ongoing preparation for the basic income experiment scheduled to start in January 2017.

Course Structure

This course consists of a series of lectures (roughly one hour) by UTA faculty or guest lecturers, followed by a short discussion session with the students. The course is divided in three large components covering the reasons for introducing a basic income, the political and policy challenges faced by the basic income model, and a section discussing basic income in the Finnish context (including the upcoming basic income experiment). Students are expected to  one required reading in advance of the lecture to familiarise themselves with the topic. Lectures will be recorded and (together with presentation slides) made available to students.

https://basicincometampere2016.wordpress.com/

Lectures

Monday 24.10. “Introduction - Basic Income: From Idea to Policy”
Jurgen De Wispelaere, University of Tampere

Monday 31.10. “Basic Income and Technological Unemployment”
Ville-Veiko Pulkka, University of Helsinki/Kela

Monday 7.11. “Basic Income and the Welfare State”
Bettina Leibetseder, Johannes Kepler University (Austria)

Monday 14.11. “Basic Income and Health"
Evelyn Forget, University of Manitoba (Canada)

Monday 21.11. “Basic Income and Reciprocity”
José A. Noguera, Autonomous University of Barcelona (Spain)

Monday 28.11. “The Politics of Basic Income”
Jurgen De Wispelaere, University of Tampere

Monday 5.12. “The Finnish Basic Income Debate”
Johanna Perkiö, University of Tampere

Monday 12.12.“The Finnish Basic Income Experiment: An Overview”
Olli Kangas, Kela

Friday 16.12. seminar

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
24-Oct-2016 – 12-Dec-2016
Periods: II
Language of instruction: English
Advanced Studies [Period II]

The course includes 10 hour lecture series by a visiting Professor Roderick Kiewiet from California Institute of Technology:

  1. Externalities 1:  Contagious Disease and Public Health Regulation
  2. Externalities 2: Labor Markets: Working Conditions and Child Labor Laws
  3. Externalities 3: Air Pollution: Command and Control vs. Market-based Regulation
  4. Monopolies:  Telecommunications and the Airline Industries
  5. Democracy and Discount Rates: The Crisis in Social Security and Public Employee Pensions

 

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
5-Sep-2016 – 21-Nov-2016
Periods: I II
Language of instruction: English

This course is part of the Master's programme in Public Choice and is compulsory for the degree students in the programme.

There are some places available for other students at the University of Tampere.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
30-Aug-2016 – 29-Nov-2016
Periods: I II
Language of instruction: English
Further information:

-----------------------------------------------------------------

In North American Studies belongs to NAM-VII Methodology.

The course examines the consequences of democratic and dictatorial regimes in

a comparative perspective. We will explore how these broad types of regimes

are defined in the literature, how they structure political participation by citizens,

how they change over time and as a result from demands from the people, and

what effects regimes have on relative performance. In addition we'll work with

comparative public opinion datasets commonly used in social science research.

Class meetings: The class will meet once a week. Students should complete

the reading assigned in the syllabus and the homework before each meeting.

Each class period will be devoted to a discussion of the main ideas encountered

in the reading and students are expected to fully participate in the discussions.

Term Papers: 2 term papers will be assigned – one critical review and a final

paper. Both will incorporate the concepts studied in the class. Think of each

paper as an exam – I do. Make sure that you use them to show what you have

learned from the readings and lectures. The final paper is due on the last day of

class.

Critical Review Essay: Semester participants will write 1 paper on any of

the topics covered in this class. These papers are not supposed to be mere

summaries of the readings. Rather, they should be thoughtful critiques of the

assigned readings.

Research Paper: Each seminar participant will prepare a final paper.

Ideally this paper will be an empirical analysis using data from the World Values

Survey (http://www.worldvaluessurvey.org/wvs.jsp) or the European Values Study

(http://www.europeanvaluesstudy.eu/) datasets. The topic of this paper is up to

you. Alternatively, students can write a literature review of a topic addressed in

this class (see the Gandhi and Lust-Okar article for an example).

Schedule

Week 1 (Sept 7) Course Introduction
Week 2 (Sept. 14) Summarizing Regime Types
Week 3 (Sept. 21) Measuring Regime Characteristics
Week 4 (Sept 22) Value Change and Postmaterialism
Week 5 (Oct. 12) Political Life in Democracies
Week 6 (Oct. 26) Political Participation in Authoritarian Systems
Week 7 (Nov. 2) Civil Society [Will meet in Pinni B 4113]
Week 8 (Nov. 9) Social Welfare
Week 9 (Nov. 16) Economic Performance
Week 10 (Nov. 23) Corruption
Week 11 (Nov. 30) Protection of Human Rights and Personal Integrity
Week 12 (Dec. 7) War and Regime Type
Week 13 (Dec. 14) Prospects for Democratic Transitions

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
7-Sep-2016 – 7-Dec-2016
Periods: I II
Language of instruction: English
Further information:

Students will be accepted to the course in the following order:

1. degree students of the MDP in Public Choice

2. degree students of the other Global Society programmes (MDP in Peace, Mediation and Conflict Research, MDP in Global and Transnational Studies, MDP in Comparative Social Policy and Welfare)

3. other degree students of UTA

4. exchange students

---------------------------------------

The course can also be taken within the Degree Programme in Politics,

when it will compensate 5 ECTS from one of the following Political

Science study units: POLVOS23 Civil Society and Political Participation

(https://www10.uta.fi/opas/opintojakso.htm?rid=9428&idx=2&uiLang=en&lang=en&lvv=2015),

or POLVOS27 Political Systems

(https://www10.uta.fi/opas/opintojakso.htm?rid=9428&idx=6&uiLang=en&lang=en&lvv=2015).

Period (9-Jan-2017 - 5-Mar-2017)
General Studies [Period III]
Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
24-Oct-2016 – 15-Dec-2016
Periods: II III
Language of instruction: English
Further information:

This module is made up of class sessions including group work (20 hours), as well as independent out of class tasks (61 hours). The module will be two periods long.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
7-Feb-2017 – 28-May-2017
Periods: III IV
Language of instruction: English
Further information:

The course is only for the degree students of the following programmes:

- MDP in Comparative Social Policy and Welfare

- MDP in Peace, Mediation and Conflict Research

- MDP in Global and Transnational Studies

- MDP in Public Choice

Studies on Global Society [Period III]

The course departs from the idea that the media is one of the central actors through which national actors become aware of far-away events and through which these events become integrated with domestic policy discourses. However, this process is a complex one. On one hand, the journalists are central players in it as they decide what is topical or newsworthy for domestic audiences. They also frame the events so that they make good sense to domestic addressees. On the other hand, in domestic contexts there are many other actors that aim to influence the public understanding of the reported events. These actors bring far-way events into their political argumentation in their attempts to advance their own political interests and desires. Interpretations that appear widely convincing are typically taken up and reported by the media.
Starting from these premises, the course suggests, the media serve not merely as an arena through which far-away events are introduced to local audiences. If anything, the media can be seen as a political arena in which different accounts of the reported events meet thus constructing public understanding of these events. Sooner or later, these understandings convert into domestic policy decisions and practices.
The course approaches the above phenomenon especially from the perspective of the traditional news media institution, i.e. of how the national media serve as a forum through which foreign news events are incorporated into domestic policy discourses. Additionally, the course discusses the role of social media in processes in which far-way news events are brought into local political argumentation, thus affecting domestic policies.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
10-Jan-2017 – 21-Mar-2017
Periods: III IV
Language of instruction: English
Further information:

Students of the MDP in Global and Trasnational Studies must complete lectures + seminar 10 ECTS.

Other students: it is possible to participate only to the lecture part of the course: lectures + essay 5 ECTS.

Lectures: Max 30 students.

Seminar: Max. 16 students.

Please note that you must enroll separately for the lectures and the seminar.

Students will be accepted to the course in the following order:

1. degree students of the MDP Global and Transnational Studies

2. degree students of the other Global Society programmes (MDP in in Peace, Mediation and Conflict Research, MDP in Quantitative Social Research, MDP in Comparative Social Policy and Welfare)

3. other degree students of UTA

4. exchange students

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
13-Jan-2017 – 24-Mar-2017
Periods: III IV
Language of instruction: English
Further information:

Max. 16 students. In order to be able to participate this seminar, students must also attend the lecture part of this course. Please note that you must enroll separately for the lectures and the seminar.

Students will be accepted to the seminar in the following order:

1. degree students of the MDP in Global and Transnational Studies

2. degree students of the other Global Society programmes (MDP in in Peace, Mediation and Conflict Research, MDP in Quantitative Social Research, MDP in Comparative Social Policy and Welfare)

3. other degree students of UTA

4. exchange students

IR theories are basically Western centric, based on Western historical experience and intellectual traditions. However, all actors in the international system do not necessarily act according to the rationality of the Western centric theories. Currently emerging powers challenge the international system and that might challenge also the mainstream IR theories. In order to avoid a conflictual behaviour, it is worth of knowing approaches based on non-Western world views. The aim of the course is to find out whether the epistemic communities in the emerging states are challenging our traditional interpretations about the international system and politics. Simultaneously students are encouraged to invent new perspectives in interpreting international politics. The course should also make it possible to evaluate how international IR as an academic discipline is as well as to estimate whether changes in the international system require new approaches in understanding international politics.

Course consist 8 h of lectures and 16 h of seminars.

Lectures give a general overview to the topic of the course: changing international order; Western centric IR and challenging IR approaches from the non-Western world.

For the seminar session each of the students have to read provided articles and each of the articles will be introduced by one student for discussion.

Students also have to write a learning diary about how they have found the texts and also explicate how those texts might affect their own understanding about the international politics.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
10-Jan-2017 – 22-Feb-2017
Periods: III
Language of instruction: English
Further information:

Compensations in International Relations:

POLKVS33 Rauhan- ja konfliktintutkimus/Peace and Conflict Research

or

POLKVS31 Maailmanpolitiikan tutkimus/The Study of World Politics

The forms of violence in civil wars are quite often more intensified and fatal than in traditional wars among states. Violence is present within the whole society and divides it into antagonist camps. Returning to peace after bloody civil war is therefore also more painful and complex. It takes time to recover from civil wars since the wounds are deeply engrained in the society and they dominate every day experiences among people. This course focuses on the ways to end violence after civil war and build up sustainable and just peace, ways to heal collective and individual trauma and reconstruct destroyed community but also damaged environment. The course examines from various thematic, but also disciplinary perspectives, challenges and obstacles of returning to peace after civil war. It is focused mostly on Finnish Civil War (1917), Irish civil wars and Middle Eastern cases. It offers multi- and inter-disciplinary focus by combining psychological, historical, peace studies and legal approaches.

Themes:

1) Mediation & peace processes

2) Reconciliation, trauma and remembering

3) Transitional justice & reconstruction

4) Refugees and forced displacement

Schedule:

16.1.2017 Marko Lehti (UTA): Introduction 

19.1.2017 Pertti Haapala (History, UTA) –”From Chaos to Compromise. The Civil War 1918 and its aftermath in Finland”

23.1.2016 Jyrki Ruohomäki (TAPRI, UTA): “The politics of memory and re-membering in post-conflict Northern Ireland”

26.1.2017 Anne Heimo (University of Turku): “Coping with the Past: The 1918 Finnish Civil War”

30.1.2017 Jukka Kekkonen (University of Helsinki): “Political and legal repression after Finnish and Spanish civil wars. A comparative analysis.”

2.2.2017 Elise Feron (TAPRI, UTA) "Northern Ireland: Peace without Reconciliation?"

6.2.2017 Laura Huttunen (anthropology, UTA): "Missing persons and the transition to peace:  Bosnia-Herzegovina and beyond"

9.2.2017 Tanja Tamminen (IOS, Germany): ”Kosovo – from dialogue to reconciliation”

13.2.2017 Roland Kostic: “Transitional Justice and Reconciliation in Bosnia-Herzegovina: Examining top-down approaches and bottom up response”

15.2.2017 Susanne Dahlgren (anthropology, UTA): “ Reconstruction of civil society after violent civil war: the case of Yemen”

20.2.2017 Anitta Kynsilehto (TAPRI): "Fleeing civil war: Syrians in exile"

23.2.2017 Armenak Tokjman (TAPRI, UTA) “Conflict transformation: examples from Syria”

27.2.2017 Bruno Lefort (TAPRI, UTA/ Montreal) “After Lebanese Civil war” (Skype lecture)

2.3.2017 Karim Maiche (TAPRI) “Partial Amnesty and the Confidence-Building in Post-Civil War Algeria”

6.3.2017 Raija-Leena Punamäki: “Traumatic war experiences and possibility of reconciliation: psychological aspects.”

9.3.2017 Aleksi Ylönen (Lisbon): "South Sudan: Endless Instability?"

13.3.2017. Frank Möller (TAPRI,  UTA) Children of Rwanda

16.3.2017 Eeva Puumala (TAPRI):  ”Refugees and asylum seekers: experiencing civil war from a distance”.

20.3.2017 Mahdi Abdile: “From democracy to perpetual chaos and improvement: The case of Somalia”

The course will take place on Mondays and Thursdays at 12-14, except:

Monday 30 January at 16-18

Monday 27 February at 16-18.

Wednesday 15.2.2017 at 12-14

Lectures 38h, literature given by lecturers and student workshops chaired by TAPRI phd-students.

Student write a lecture diary on the basis of lectures and given material.

Students participate to dialogic workshops (4 sessions, 2 hours each) facilitated by TAPRI’s PhD students in which target orientated questions are given beforehand and joint concluding statement are written jointly.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
16-Jan-2017 – 20-Mar-2017
Periods: III IV
Language of instruction: English
Further information:

Course: open for all students but targeted specially for students at Faculty of Social Sciences.

Compensations:

Degree Programme in Social Sciences: SOSM7

Degree Programme in Politics (International Relations): POLKVS33 Peace and Conflict Research

Advanced Studies [Period III]
Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
10-Jan-2017 – 4-Apr-2017
Periods: III IV
Language of instruction: English
Further information:

Course in North American Studies: NAM-VII Methodology

Teaching
9-Jan-2017 – 24-Apr-2017
Periods: III IV
Language of instruction: English
Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
17-Jan-2017 – 23-Feb-2017
Periods: III
Language of instruction: English

Schedule:

January 11: Introduction

January 18: Social Choice and Electoral Systems

January 25: Comparative Visions of Representation

February 1: Variety of Electoral Systems

February 8: Proportional Representation in Practice

February 15: Mixed Electoral Systems and the Single Transferable Vote

February 22: Majoritarian Electoral Systems ASSIGNMENT #1 DUE

March 1: Coalition Formation Processes

March 8: No class this week

March 15: Electoral Systems and Interest Representation

March 22: Electoral Systems in Divided Societies: The Case of South Africa

March 29: Elections in Authoritarian Societies ASSIGNMENT #2 DUE

April 5: Representation at the Local Level

April 12: The Power of Agenda Setting

April 26: Final papers are due

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
11-Jan-2017 – 12-Apr-2017
Periods: III IV
Language of instruction: English
Period (6-Mar-2017 - 28-May-2017)
General Studies [Period IV]
Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
7-Feb-2017 – 28-May-2017
Periods: III IV
Language of instruction: English
Further information:

The course is only for the degree students of the following programmes:

- MDP in Comparative Social Policy and Welfare

- MDP in Peace, Mediation and Conflict Research

- MDP in Global and Transnational Studies

- MDP in Public Choice

Studies on Global Society [Period IV]

The course departs from the idea that the media is one of the central actors through which national actors become aware of far-away events and through which these events become integrated with domestic policy discourses. However, this process is a complex one. On one hand, the journalists are central players in it as they decide what is topical or newsworthy for domestic audiences. They also frame the events so that they make good sense to domestic addressees. On the other hand, in domestic contexts there are many other actors that aim to influence the public understanding of the reported events. These actors bring far-way events into their political argumentation in their attempts to advance their own political interests and desires. Interpretations that appear widely convincing are typically taken up and reported by the media.
Starting from these premises, the course suggests, the media serve not merely as an arena through which far-away events are introduced to local audiences. If anything, the media can be seen as a political arena in which different accounts of the reported events meet thus constructing public understanding of these events. Sooner or later, these understandings convert into domestic policy decisions and practices.
The course approaches the above phenomenon especially from the perspective of the traditional news media institution, i.e. of how the national media serve as a forum through which foreign news events are incorporated into domestic policy discourses. Additionally, the course discusses the role of social media in processes in which far-way news events are brought into local political argumentation, thus affecting domestic policies.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
10-Jan-2017 – 21-Mar-2017
Periods: III IV
Language of instruction: English
Further information:

Students of the MDP in Global and Trasnational Studies must complete lectures + seminar 10 ECTS.

Other students: it is possible to participate only to the lecture part of the course: lectures + essay 5 ECTS.

Lectures: Max 30 students.

Seminar: Max. 16 students.

Please note that you must enroll separately for the lectures and the seminar.

Students will be accepted to the course in the following order:

1. degree students of the MDP Global and Transnational Studies

2. degree students of the other Global Society programmes (MDP in in Peace, Mediation and Conflict Research, MDP in Quantitative Social Research, MDP in Comparative Social Policy and Welfare)

3. other degree students of UTA

4. exchange students

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
13-Jan-2017 – 24-Mar-2017
Periods: III IV
Language of instruction: English
Further information:

Max. 16 students. In order to be able to participate this seminar, students must also attend the lecture part of this course. Please note that you must enroll separately for the lectures and the seminar.

Students will be accepted to the seminar in the following order:

1. degree students of the MDP in Global and Transnational Studies

2. degree students of the other Global Society programmes (MDP in in Peace, Mediation and Conflict Research, MDP in Quantitative Social Research, MDP in Comparative Social Policy and Welfare)

3. other degree students of UTA

4. exchange students

The forms of violence in civil wars are quite often more intensified and fatal than in traditional wars among states. Violence is present within the whole society and divides it into antagonist camps. Returning to peace after bloody civil war is therefore also more painful and complex. It takes time to recover from civil wars since the wounds are deeply engrained in the society and they dominate every day experiences among people. This course focuses on the ways to end violence after civil war and build up sustainable and just peace, ways to heal collective and individual trauma and reconstruct destroyed community but also damaged environment. The course examines from various thematic, but also disciplinary perspectives, challenges and obstacles of returning to peace after civil war. It is focused mostly on Finnish Civil War (1917), Irish civil wars and Middle Eastern cases. It offers multi- and inter-disciplinary focus by combining psychological, historical, peace studies and legal approaches.

Themes:

1) Mediation & peace processes

2) Reconciliation, trauma and remembering

3) Transitional justice & reconstruction

4) Refugees and forced displacement

Schedule:

16.1.2017 Marko Lehti (UTA): Introduction 

19.1.2017 Pertti Haapala (History, UTA) –”From Chaos to Compromise. The Civil War 1918 and its aftermath in Finland”

23.1.2016 Jyrki Ruohomäki (TAPRI, UTA): “The politics of memory and re-membering in post-conflict Northern Ireland”

26.1.2017 Anne Heimo (University of Turku): “Coping with the Past: The 1918 Finnish Civil War”

30.1.2017 Jukka Kekkonen (University of Helsinki): “Political and legal repression after Finnish and Spanish civil wars. A comparative analysis.”

2.2.2017 Elise Feron (TAPRI, UTA) "Northern Ireland: Peace without Reconciliation?"

6.2.2017 Laura Huttunen (anthropology, UTA): "Missing persons and the transition to peace:  Bosnia-Herzegovina and beyond"

9.2.2017 Tanja Tamminen (IOS, Germany): ”Kosovo – from dialogue to reconciliation”

13.2.2017 Roland Kostic: “Transitional Justice and Reconciliation in Bosnia-Herzegovina: Examining top-down approaches and bottom up response”

15.2.2017 Susanne Dahlgren (anthropology, UTA): “ Reconstruction of civil society after violent civil war: the case of Yemen”

20.2.2017 Anitta Kynsilehto (TAPRI): "Fleeing civil war: Syrians in exile"

23.2.2017 Armenak Tokjman (TAPRI, UTA) “Conflict transformation: examples from Syria”

27.2.2017 Bruno Lefort (TAPRI, UTA/ Montreal) “After Lebanese Civil war” (Skype lecture)

2.3.2017 Karim Maiche (TAPRI) “Partial Amnesty and the Confidence-Building in Post-Civil War Algeria”

6.3.2017 Raija-Leena Punamäki: “Traumatic war experiences and possibility of reconciliation: psychological aspects.”

9.3.2017 Aleksi Ylönen (Lisbon): "South Sudan: Endless Instability?"

13.3.2017. Frank Möller (TAPRI,  UTA) Children of Rwanda

16.3.2017 Eeva Puumala (TAPRI):  ”Refugees and asylum seekers: experiencing civil war from a distance”.

20.3.2017 Mahdi Abdile: “From democracy to perpetual chaos and improvement: The case of Somalia”

The course will take place on Mondays and Thursdays at 12-14, except:

Monday 30 January at 16-18

Monday 27 February at 16-18.

Wednesday 15.2.2017 at 12-14

Lectures 38h, literature given by lecturers and student workshops chaired by TAPRI phd-students.

Student write a lecture diary on the basis of lectures and given material.

Students participate to dialogic workshops (4 sessions, 2 hours each) facilitated by TAPRI’s PhD students in which target orientated questions are given beforehand and joint concluding statement are written jointly.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
16-Jan-2017 – 20-Mar-2017
Periods: III IV
Language of instruction: English
Further information:

Course: open for all students but targeted specially for students at Faculty of Social Sciences.

Compensations:

Degree Programme in Social Sciences: SOSM7

Degree Programme in Politics (International Relations): POLKVS33 Peace and Conflict Research

In this module we study different approaches to peace through the examples of specific individuals who have earned recognition for their actions in the cause of peace. Here the term ‘peacebuilder’ is interpreted in a broad sense. The lectures will introduce a selection of individuals, the conflict situations they faced, and the means of their coping with theconflict. These personalities will include some acclaimed peacebuilders and historical figures like Mohandas Gandhi, Rosa Parks, Nelson Mandela and Willy Brandt. Their individual positions on non-violence, or their acceptance of qualified violence under certain circumstances, will be discussed. Attention will also be paid to the peacebuilders’ own explanations of their motivations, actions and objectives, and the – potentially different – international perception of their work in hindsight.

Furthermore, each student will present a research paper on a chosen individual and thereby contribute one approach to the complex topic of peacebuilding. Interested students are encouraged to start thinking about the choice of ‘their’ peacebuilder (different from the individuals presented by the teacher) already before the first session. The sources used for the research paper should ideally include original writings and speeches by the selected peacebuilder.

Enrolment for University Studies

The course primarily targets degree students in the Master's programme in Peace, Mediation and Conflict Research, and secondarily degree students of the Global Society programmes. If places are available, UTA Master's degree students from other programmes can be selected to the course.

Max. 18 students

Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
8-Mar-2017 – 26-Apr-2017
Periods: IV
Language of instruction: English
Advanced Studies [Period IV]
Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
10-Jan-2017 – 4-Apr-2017
Periods: III IV
Language of instruction: English
Further information:

Course in North American Studies: NAM-VII Methodology

Teaching
9-Jan-2017 – 24-Apr-2017
Periods: III IV
Language of instruction: English

Schedule:

January 11: Introduction

January 18: Social Choice and Electoral Systems

January 25: Comparative Visions of Representation

February 1: Variety of Electoral Systems

February 8: Proportional Representation in Practice

February 15: Mixed Electoral Systems and the Single Transferable Vote

February 22: Majoritarian Electoral Systems ASSIGNMENT #1 DUE

March 1: Coalition Formation Processes

March 8: No class this week

March 15: Electoral Systems and Interest Representation

March 22: Electoral Systems in Divided Societies: The Case of South Africa

March 29: Elections in Authoritarian Societies ASSIGNMENT #2 DUE

April 5: Representation at the Local Level

April 12: The Power of Agenda Setting

April 26: Final papers are due

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
11-Jan-2017 – 12-Apr-2017
Periods: III IV
Language of instruction: English