x !
Archived teaching schedules 2015–2016
You are browsing archived teaching schedule. Current teaching schedules can be found here.
Master's Programme in English Language and Literature

Periods

Period I (31-Aug-2015 – 18-Oct-2015)
Period II (19-Oct-2015 – 20-Dec-2015)
Period III (11-Jan-2016 – 6-Mar-2016)
Period IV (7-Mar-2016 – 29-May-2016)

Course enrolment

Course enrolment is predominantly done through the electronic enrolment system in NettiOpsu. A good way to enrol on courses is by browsing the electronic teaching schedule and using the Enrol buttons in course descriptions. This way you can be certain that you get all the necessary information about the course and any special arrangements for enrolment.

Enrolment times

Enrolment for autumn theme courses begins Mon 3rd August and ends Tue 18th August.

Enrolment for spring theme courses begins Mon 30th November and ends Tue 8th December.

Enrolment for other courses starting in the first period begins Mon 17th August and ends Thu 27th August.

Enrolment for other courses starting in the third period begins Mon 7th December and ends Thursday 17th December.

Theme course enrolment

What are Theme courses? Theme courses are alternative courses in English Language and Literature Advanced Studies. In curricula prior to autumn 2015 they were less defined on the curriculum level and were called Options.

Autumn and spring theme courses have separate enrolment, see enrolment times above. Students will be selected onto theme courses on the day after the enrolment time ends. After student selection there will be a fixed period when we want you to cancel your enrolment if you have been selected onto more theme courses than you wish to take. This period will be 20th to 25th August for autumn theme courses and 10th to 17th December for spring theme courses. You will be reminded. (Cancellations will be by email to Study Coordinator Aatu Lehtovaara.)

Book exams etc.

Information on book exams, essays and other independent study alternatives.

Reading and Research Week

The English degree programme will not have contact teaching on week 43 i.e. 19.-23.10.2015 nor on week 9 i.e. 29.2.-4.3.2016.

Dropping out of courses

If a student has registered for a course but will not be taking it, he/she must cancel his/her registration by the set date before the course begins so that another student may take the course instead.

If a student does not participate in the course and does not cancel his/her enrolment, or if he/she discontinues the course, he/she will be assigned a fail grade for the course in question.

In The School of Language, Translation and Literary Studies students must cancel their registration within a week from the course’s first meeting.

Teaching schedule preview information

A teaching schedule planning document, which has information on teaching before that information is published here, can be viewed via the degree programme website.

Period (31-Aug-2015 - 18-Oct-2015)
Syventävät opinnot [Period I]
Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
8-Sep-2015 – 17-Dec-2015
Periods: I II
Language of instruction: English

The course starts with a discussion of the nature of variationist approaches to language. The methods of Labovian sociolinguistics, which form the backbone of most variationist approaches, will be discussed in some detail during the course. During the course we will also examine in detail the methods applied in some classic sociolinguistic, dialectological and historical studies. The course includes a discussion of the statistical methods used in variationist linguistics.

A reading list will be provided at the beginning of the course.

Course work includes weekly sessions, background reading, oral presentation in the class, and a final essay.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
10-Sep-2015 – 17-Dec-2015
Periods: I II
Language of instruction: English

Lecturer Norri’s seminar

My seminar is primarily meant for students who are interested in doing research on English vocabulary, English word-formation, dictionaries of English, and English for Specific Purposes (English as used in various types of scientific writing). In seminar papers dealing with vocabulary, it is possible to concentrate either on Present-day English or on chronological developments in English vocabulary and dictionaries of English. The following are some examples of topics covered in recent MA theses: film-related neologisms in the magazine Total Film; slogans used in refractive surgery advertising; the offensiveness and usage of the lexemes bitch and son of a bitch; insulting nationality words in some British and American dictionaries and in the British National Corpus.

In the autumn term, we will concentrate on finding a topic for you to write on and on putting together a research proposal (circa five to ten pages). Practical questions relating to the writing of an MA thesis will also be addressed, as will various ways of finding research material for your study (corpora and other electronic sources, printed books, etc.).

During the spring term, students are expected to write a seminar paper (approximately twenty pages, but longer contributions are also welcome), to be presented and discussed in our meetings. The seminar paper is usually a first draft of the MA thesis, and our purpose should be to lay a solid foundation for the final thesis in our sessions, ideally completing a significant portion of the thesis in the course of the academic year.

To apply for a place in my seminar, please act according to the instructions. I would appreciate it if those who are interested in attending the seminar sent me an email (juhani.norri@uta.fi) to arrange for an appointment before the seminar officially begins. It would be good to discuss your topic and your approach to it as early as possible. (My summer holiday runs from July 13th till August 16th; meetings are possible both before and after it.)

Lecturer Piipponen’s Seminar

This seminar is open for students interested in literary analysis and cultural studies. I would like to recommend this seminar especially for those students who are interested in women’s writing and gender/queer studies, popular literature (especially detective fiction), the study of genres and generic conventions, American literature (1900-), and literary works dealing with imperialism, postcolonialism and ethnicity.

During the autumn, participants start working on their thesis and write a research proposal in which they specify the primary material, research question and theoretical approach of the thesis (approximately five pages); the proposal is then presented to and discussed by the seminar group. During the spring, participants continue their work and present their seminar paper (which ideally consists of one or two chapters of the actual thesis). The goal of the seminar is to acquire the knowledge and skills needed to complete the thesis and to offer support and practical advice during the writing process. Besides the seminar sessions, also individual consultation sessions will be arranged according to the needs of the participants.

To apply for a place, please act as instructed; if you want to start working on your thesis before the autumn, please send me an email as soon as possible (maarit.piipponen@uta.fi).

Professor Klemola's Seminar

Linguistics, especially language variation and change

My seminar is open for students interested in all kinds of linguistics topics. However, I would recommend the seminar especially for those students who are interested in corpus-based studies of variation and change in English. Possible seminar (and pro gradu) projects may focus, for example, on grammatical variation in regional varieties of English. The study of regional variation in English is facilitated by the recent International Corpus of English (ICE) family of corpora, which provide an easy access to a wide range of varieties of English from all over the English-speaking world.

The main task during the autumn term will be to write and present a research proposal (five to ten pages). In addition, each student will be expected to draft—in consultation with me—a personal study and research plan for the whole academic year. We will also focus on practical questions linked with writing a thesis, look at some examples of recent gradus completed in the English department, and read a number of articles linked with the topics you are working on.

During the spring term, each student will write a seminar paper (20+ pages), to be presented and discussed in the group. Ideally, the seminar paper will function as the first draft of your pro gradu thesis.

Lecturer McGinley's Seminar

This course is for students interested in literary study and is designed to help in writing your MA thesis and to give experience of academic literary analysis, discussion and debate. Throughout the course there will be classes addressing research methods, style, structure, and composition. But the predominant emphasis will be on the actual writing of your thesis. The first half of the course will see you defining your topic and submitting an abstract for discussion with your supervisor early in the course, and building towards a presentation of the thesis proposal (12-15 pages) and discussion of it with other students. The second half of the course will involve writing a draft of your thesis (about 5000-7000 words), and again presenting it to the class for comment and discussion. During the presentation sessions, each student will also serve as commentator on another student’s thesis, giving constructive feedback on the presentation before the discussion is opened and the other students invited to share their thoughts. Assessment will be by completion of assignments (abstracts, research proposals, and thesis drafts) and ‘participation’, which will include attendance, fulfillment of all presentation requirements, performance as commentator, and contribution to class discussions.

Professor Pahta's Seminar

Language in context, genre and discourse studies, applied linguistics

This seminar runs for the next calendar year, starting in January 2016. The seminar is intended for students who are interested in analyzing language use in context, i.e. in relation to various language-external factors, using qualitative or quantitative methods, including discourse analysis or corpus linguistics. The students’ interests can relate, for example, to English in specific social or situational contexts, English as a global language in non-Anglophone contexts, bi- and multilingualism, computer-mediated communication, or language use in the history of English. Students interested in studying English in the context of learning and teaching are also welcome.

The seminar offers practical advice, guidance and support during the process of planning and writing the thesis, addressing each step in the research process. As working methods we will use collaborative group work, including discussions of relevant reading and the students’ own projects, and a course diary.

During the spring term, students are expected to produce a research proposal, specifying the main elements of their pro gradu thesis, to present it to the seminar group, and to start working on their thesis. In the autumn term, students continue to work on their thesis. The aim during the seminar year is to finish a draft version of the entire thesis; the minimum requirement is to produce at least 3-4 draft chapters of the thesis, serving as “the seminar paper”. Towards the end of the seminar year, each student’s thesis draft is discussed in class.

To apply for a place, please act as instructed. If you want to attend this seminar, please send me an email in August before the seminar enrollment ends to arrange for an appointment to discuss your thesis project. The appointments will take place in September (paivi . pahta  @  uta . fi).

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
7-Sep-2015 – 25-May-2016
Periods: I II III IV
Language of instruction: English

New Zealand English is one of the world's youngest varieties of English. We discuss its origins and development, looking at theories of new dialect formation and the development of postcolonial Englishes in general, and get to know the defining characteristics of NZE at the levels of pronunciation, lexis, and grammar. Comparisons are made between NZE, its closest relative Australian English, and the parent variety, British English. Assessment is based on class participation, a presentation, and a final essay.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
7-Sep-2015 – 15-Oct-2015
Periods: I
Language of instruction: English

The course looks into the major socio-historical developments in the English-speaking world between the Restoration and mid-19th century, and the ways in which the English language and the attitudes towards it changed. Through introductory mini-lectures and homework reading assignments to be discussed in groups in class, we will examine the major historical events which shaped the British Empire, the rising trends in the writing of English grammars and dictionaries, and the ultimate spread of English around the world.

The course work will include weekly assignments including background reading and practical exercises examining the changes in English grammar and vocabulary through a number of electronic databases (e.g. The Oxford English Dictionary and different corpora of British and American English). The assessment will be based on an end-of-term exam and a final written course report.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
7-Sep-2015 – 15-Oct-2015
Periods: I
Language of instruction: English

Close reading is a practice of reading literature in a way that allows one, as the name implies, to get closer to the text under analysis. This entails care and attention not only to WHAT a text is saying, but also to HOW the text says it and how one responds as the reader. In close reading, several factors (content, form, interpretation) are combined and put under scrutiny in order to produce readings of literature that transcend first impressions and instead seek to know and learn more about the text at hand.

In this option, we will first look into the tradition and practice of close reading as it has been understood in the history of literary criticism, and we will also consider its role in the advancement of literary theory in the 20th century. (This course is not highly theoretical, but it offers a good foundation for further courses in literary theory and methodology.)

After the background has been provided, the students will work in teams for the rest of the course and carry out a project assignment in close reading. The objective is to be able to work together, with defined tasks for each, choose a text for analysis, identify its vital factors, and negotiate how to present the results to the class. Assessment will be based on one's participation in the project assignment as a whole.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
10-Sep-2015 – 17-Dec-2015
Periods: I II
Language of instruction: English

The course explores selected clausal argument structure constructions in English, and the idea that they carry particular meanings as constructions. It begins with an introduction to basic assumptions and principles in the study of sentential complementation, including the postulation of understood subjects. It then turns to the discussion of selected constructions in English involving sentential complements, with a focus on the matrix verbs selecting them and on the syntactic and semantic properties of the constructions. These include patterns with to infinitives and -ing complements, especially the types of I remembered to mail the letter and I remembered mailing the letter. Authentic data from electronic corpora are made use of in the course.


The course is largely a lecture course, with some homework assignments. Course work includes regular attendance, class participation, a brief essay presented in class on an approved topic, and a final exam. The final exam requires an amount of additional reading, consisting of articles and book chapters on complementation. (These are made available to participants.)

Friday mornings from 8:30 a.m. to 10:40 a.m., with a five-minute break in the middle.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
11-Sep-2015 – 27-Nov-2015
Periods: I II
Language of instruction: English

The course focuses on the analysis of selected structures of sentential complementation in recent English (other than those featured in my Constructions course). These include both object control and some subject control constructions, with some discussion of diachronic changes in recent centuries. Object deletion phenomena are also discussed. Further, attention is devoted to the analysis of innovative or creative uses of selected constructions in current English and to their interpretation. Data are primarily drawn from synchronic and diachronic computer corpora of English.

                      Course work includes regular attendance, class participation, some homework assignments, a brief paper to be presented in class on complementation, and a final exam. The final exam requires some additional reading, consisting of articles and book chapters on complementation. (These are made available to participants.)

                      Time: Fridays from 12:15 p.m. to 1:45 p.m.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
11-Sep-2015 – 27-Nov-2015
Periods: I II
Language of instruction: English

The aim of the course is to give the participants an overall picture of the principles of the study of words. We shall begin by looking at the varieties of English (e.g. geographical, dialectal, social, formal, informal, slang, technical, pejorative) and how these are reflected on the level of vocabulary. The labelling of the different types of variety in dictionaries will also be discussed. After this, the course moves on to examine the main sources of English vocabulary (techniques of word-formation, foreign adoptions). Next, aspects of meaning will be addressed, including the ways in which the meanings of words change along dimensions such as gender (e.g. guy, certain articles of clothing) and pejoration (e.g. idiot, imbecile, moron). We shall finally discuss larger structures pertaining to the lexicon. These may be either paradigmatic relations (e.g. synonymy, polysemy, antonymy, lexical fields, lexical sets) or syntagmatic ones (e.g. collocations).

Course work includes regular attendance of the weekly sessions, homework assignments (practical exercises relating to various aspects of vocabulary), and an essay on a specific topic relating to the study of words.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
11-Sep-2015 – 27-Nov-2015
Periods: I II
Language of instruction: English

This is an introductory survey course that will enable students to understand major research questions and goals in second language acquisition, the extent of current knowledge in this area of inquiry, and how we can view the same questions from different theoretical vantage points. Two of the central questions for discussion will be whether there is a critical period for the native-like acquisition of a second language and the extent to which second language grammars (including systematically occurring non-native errors in syntax, morphology, and phonology) can be directly attributed to the influence of the grammar of the learner's native language.

The course will consist of weekly instruction, weekly readings to be summarized orally by pairs of students, active participation in discussions, short data collection assignments, and a final exam.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
8-Sep-2015 – 15-Dec-2015
Periods: I II
Language of instruction: English

This course will focus on the social aspects of language variation. The first half of the course will be devoted to a detailed discussion of some of the central issues in so-called Labovian sociolinguistics/microsociolinguistics. During the second half of the course the focus will be on a number of sociolinguistic topics including language and ethnicity, language, sex, and gender, language contact and language change.

A reading list will be provided at the beginning of the course.

Course work includes weekly sessions, background reading, oral presentation in the class, and a final essay.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
10-Sep-2015 – 17-Dec-2015
Periods: I II
Language of instruction: English

The course considers the challenges that language variation poses for language teaching. It is specially designed for future professionals in language learning and teaching, and offers suggestions and support for pro gradu research in this area, but it is useful for any students interested in language variation. The course reviews some of the many dimensions along which a language can vary, such as mode and register (spoken and written language, formal and informal styles), domain (special languages), social class, gender (men's and women's language) and geographical region (Englishes), and the ways in which these dimensions are and can be taken into account in the classroom. The course includes lectures and discussions of different dimensions of language variation, background reading, and a small-scale project and its written report.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
8-Sep-2015 – 29-Sep-2015
Periods: I
Language of instruction: English

In this course we will trace the development of detective fiction from the end of the 19th century to the present. We will specifically examine how detective fiction represents and constructs gender, class and ethnicity. For example, we will analyse how Arthur Conan Doyle's detective Sherlock Holmes protects the empire against foreign influence, and how African-American writers (e.g. Pauline Hopkins, Barbara Neely, Walter Mosley) discuss race and crime in their fictions. Further, we will examine how the feminist movement has influenced the field of crime writing - how it introduced new themes into the genre, such as child abuse, sexism, and racism.

Assessment: essay/learning diary, oral presentation and class contribution.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
7-Sep-2015 – 14-Dec-2015
Periods: I II
Language of instruction: English

In this course we will examine the question of murder and representation, with a special focus on gender issues. We will concentrate on one type of murder, serial murder, as a cultural narrative from the end of the 19th century to the present. During this course we will analyze the cultural imagery and social contexts of serial killing in Britain and the United States. In particular, we will try to answer this question: how are gender and "normalcy" constructed through murder narratives, deviation, and crime? We will start with the case of Jack the Ripper - the first "modern" serial killer - and his victims and move on to representations of male and female psychopaths and lesbian serial killing. We will explore such different genres as films and documentary programmes as well as texts written by FBI agents, serial killers and psychiatrists. We will also read three novels: Robert Bloch's Psycho, Bret Easton Ellis' American Psycho, and Helen Zahavi's Dirty Weekend.

Assessment: essay and class contribution.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
8-Sep-2015 – 15-Dec-2015
Periods: I II
Language of instruction: English

This course offers a critical and comprehensive introduction to computer-mediated communication (CMC) and the academic study of digital culture. We will discuss the history of text technologies from manuscripts to smart phones and hypertext, investigate how the concepts of reading and writing have changed over the centuries and are changing right now, explore how well traditional linguistic and discourse analytical models can be applied to digital discourses, carry out our own analyses of digital media, and discover how English is changing as a result of the borderless and unedited nature of online communication. The students will be encouraged to suggest timely topics for discussion and to make use of their own experiences with digital media.

The course work will involve background reading, in-class discussions, group work and online interaction.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
7-Sep-2015 – 14-Dec-2015
Periods: I II
Language of instruction: English

This course will address the question “What is Scottish Literature?” by examining the works of key authors from the Middle Ages to the present day to identify the social, historical, and cultural contexts and significant themes that have defined the Scottish literary canon. We will explore themes such as religion, duality, fantasy and the supernatural, language, and gender, and investigate the contributions of Scots, Gaelic, and Nordic cultures to identify the diverse influences that have shaped Scottish culture through the centuries. We will also discuss the theoretical controversies and social conflicts that have informed debate over the construction of the Scottish literary canon.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
7-Sep-2015 – 14-Dec-2015
Periods: I II
Language of instruction: English

This course will examine the development of British drama from the late seventeenth and eighteenth-century. Studying a selection of plays from genres including comedy, tragedy, satire, and ballad-opera, and attending to changes in the staging conventions of the period, we will examine the historical and social contexts of the drama and look at the theatre as a site of political and social debate that engaged with topics such as gender and power, imperialism, British identity, and political corruption.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
8-Sep-2015 – 15-Dec-2015
Periods: I II
Language of instruction: English

This course reviews linguistic as well as various socio-cultural aspects of English as a global language, paying attention to both theory and practice. The course has three main aims. Firstly, it briefly outlines the development and characteristics of English as a global language – the variation, change and diversification of English in different regions, societies, communities and settings in the world – with specific emphasis on non-native-speaker contexts. Secondly, the course provides a critical overview of issues around and debates on the impact of the spread of English in the world. Thirdly, it familiarizes students with a range of linguistic and discourse-pragmatic approaches to studying English as a global language, also providing suggestions and support for pro gradu research in this area. Course work includes weekly sessions, background reading, and a mini project, its oral presentation and written report.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
9-Sep-2015 – 16-Dec-2015
Periods: I II
Language of instruction: English

Modernity is associated with the disenchantment of the world, the dissolution of myths and the destruction of grand narratives. Theorists have debated whether aesthetic modernism can be viewed as a fitting response to the pessimism inherent in modernity or a nihilistic pursuit in itself. We will examine a number of past and contemporary poems, plays, novels and short stories that reflect the perceived meaninglessness of modern life. The texts will include selections from the Earl of Rochester and Alexander Pope to Samuel Beckett and Cormac McCarthy. Assessment: class participation, group work, essay.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
8-Sep-2015 – 15-Dec-2015
Periods: I II
Language of instruction: English

Satire is a critical genre that tests the limits of good taste and freedom of speech. The role of public ridicule in society and the rights of satirists have been debated since antiquity, which has generated an extensive theoretical literature around the topic. The course will include a variety of examples of satire from the Enlightenment to modernism and postmodernism. In addition to literary texts, we will also examine contemporary examples of satire from television, film and new media. After the course, students will be familiar with a number of theoretical approaches to satire and have a grasp of the history of the genre. Assessment: class participation, short presentations, essay.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
7-Sep-2015 – 14-Dec-2015
Periods: I II
Language of instruction: English

Formulaic language covers a range of phenomena – e.g. proverbs, idioms, collocations, lexical bundles and speech act routines – that are thought to be retrieved from memory (by the speaker) and processed (by the hearer) as holistic units rather than being creatively assembled on the basis of the compositional rules of syntax each time they are needed. However, there is considerable disagreement among linguists regarding the exact nature and scope of formulaicity.

In this course, we will look at a range of relevant phenomena and describe their linguistic characteristics in order to arrive at a better understanding of formulaicity. For example, formulaic language is often semantically opaque (e.g. to beat about the bush), but there are good reasons to believe that semantically transparent sequences such as It was lovely to see you or even more flexible constructions involving slots for open-class items such NP be-TENSE sorry to keep-TENSE you waiting are formulaic in nature. We will be looking at different methodologies to measure formulaicity (e.g. corpus linguistics and psycholinguistics) and consider the acquisition of formulaic language in both first and second language learners.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
14-Sep-2015 – 14-Oct-2015
Periods: I
Language of instruction: English
Period (19-Oct-2015 - 20-Dec-2015)
Syventävät opinnot [Period II]
Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
8-Sep-2015 – 17-Dec-2015
Periods: I II
Language of instruction: English

The course starts with a discussion of the nature of variationist approaches to language. The methods of Labovian sociolinguistics, which form the backbone of most variationist approaches, will be discussed in some detail during the course. During the course we will also examine in detail the methods applied in some classic sociolinguistic, dialectological and historical studies. The course includes a discussion of the statistical methods used in variationist linguistics.

A reading list will be provided at the beginning of the course.

Course work includes weekly sessions, background reading, oral presentation in the class, and a final essay.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
10-Sep-2015 – 17-Dec-2015
Periods: I II
Language of instruction: English

Lecturer Norri’s seminar

My seminar is primarily meant for students who are interested in doing research on English vocabulary, English word-formation, dictionaries of English, and English for Specific Purposes (English as used in various types of scientific writing). In seminar papers dealing with vocabulary, it is possible to concentrate either on Present-day English or on chronological developments in English vocabulary and dictionaries of English. The following are some examples of topics covered in recent MA theses: film-related neologisms in the magazine Total Film; slogans used in refractive surgery advertising; the offensiveness and usage of the lexemes bitch and son of a bitch; insulting nationality words in some British and American dictionaries and in the British National Corpus.

In the autumn term, we will concentrate on finding a topic for you to write on and on putting together a research proposal (circa five to ten pages). Practical questions relating to the writing of an MA thesis will also be addressed, as will various ways of finding research material for your study (corpora and other electronic sources, printed books, etc.).

During the spring term, students are expected to write a seminar paper (approximately twenty pages, but longer contributions are also welcome), to be presented and discussed in our meetings. The seminar paper is usually a first draft of the MA thesis, and our purpose should be to lay a solid foundation for the final thesis in our sessions, ideally completing a significant portion of the thesis in the course of the academic year.

To apply for a place in my seminar, please act according to the instructions. I would appreciate it if those who are interested in attending the seminar sent me an email (juhani.norri@uta.fi) to arrange for an appointment before the seminar officially begins. It would be good to discuss your topic and your approach to it as early as possible. (My summer holiday runs from July 13th till August 16th; meetings are possible both before and after it.)

Lecturer Piipponen’s Seminar

This seminar is open for students interested in literary analysis and cultural studies. I would like to recommend this seminar especially for those students who are interested in women’s writing and gender/queer studies, popular literature (especially detective fiction), the study of genres and generic conventions, American literature (1900-), and literary works dealing with imperialism, postcolonialism and ethnicity.

During the autumn, participants start working on their thesis and write a research proposal in which they specify the primary material, research question and theoretical approach of the thesis (approximately five pages); the proposal is then presented to and discussed by the seminar group. During the spring, participants continue their work and present their seminar paper (which ideally consists of one or two chapters of the actual thesis). The goal of the seminar is to acquire the knowledge and skills needed to complete the thesis and to offer support and practical advice during the writing process. Besides the seminar sessions, also individual consultation sessions will be arranged according to the needs of the participants.

To apply for a place, please act as instructed; if you want to start working on your thesis before the autumn, please send me an email as soon as possible (maarit.piipponen@uta.fi).

Professor Klemola's Seminar

Linguistics, especially language variation and change

My seminar is open for students interested in all kinds of linguistics topics. However, I would recommend the seminar especially for those students who are interested in corpus-based studies of variation and change in English. Possible seminar (and pro gradu) projects may focus, for example, on grammatical variation in regional varieties of English. The study of regional variation in English is facilitated by the recent International Corpus of English (ICE) family of corpora, which provide an easy access to a wide range of varieties of English from all over the English-speaking world.

The main task during the autumn term will be to write and present a research proposal (five to ten pages). In addition, each student will be expected to draft—in consultation with me—a personal study and research plan for the whole academic year. We will also focus on practical questions linked with writing a thesis, look at some examples of recent gradus completed in the English department, and read a number of articles linked with the topics you are working on.

During the spring term, each student will write a seminar paper (20+ pages), to be presented and discussed in the group. Ideally, the seminar paper will function as the first draft of your pro gradu thesis.

Lecturer McGinley's Seminar

This course is for students interested in literary study and is designed to help in writing your MA thesis and to give experience of academic literary analysis, discussion and debate. Throughout the course there will be classes addressing research methods, style, structure, and composition. But the predominant emphasis will be on the actual writing of your thesis. The first half of the course will see you defining your topic and submitting an abstract for discussion with your supervisor early in the course, and building towards a presentation of the thesis proposal (12-15 pages) and discussion of it with other students. The second half of the course will involve writing a draft of your thesis (about 5000-7000 words), and again presenting it to the class for comment and discussion. During the presentation sessions, each student will also serve as commentator on another student’s thesis, giving constructive feedback on the presentation before the discussion is opened and the other students invited to share their thoughts. Assessment will be by completion of assignments (abstracts, research proposals, and thesis drafts) and ‘participation’, which will include attendance, fulfillment of all presentation requirements, performance as commentator, and contribution to class discussions.

Professor Pahta's Seminar

Language in context, genre and discourse studies, applied linguistics

This seminar runs for the next calendar year, starting in January 2016. The seminar is intended for students who are interested in analyzing language use in context, i.e. in relation to various language-external factors, using qualitative or quantitative methods, including discourse analysis or corpus linguistics. The students’ interests can relate, for example, to English in specific social or situational contexts, English as a global language in non-Anglophone contexts, bi- and multilingualism, computer-mediated communication, or language use in the history of English. Students interested in studying English in the context of learning and teaching are also welcome.

The seminar offers practical advice, guidance and support during the process of planning and writing the thesis, addressing each step in the research process. As working methods we will use collaborative group work, including discussions of relevant reading and the students’ own projects, and a course diary.

During the spring term, students are expected to produce a research proposal, specifying the main elements of their pro gradu thesis, to present it to the seminar group, and to start working on their thesis. In the autumn term, students continue to work on their thesis. The aim during the seminar year is to finish a draft version of the entire thesis; the minimum requirement is to produce at least 3-4 draft chapters of the thesis, serving as “the seminar paper”. Towards the end of the seminar year, each student’s thesis draft is discussed in class.

To apply for a place, please act as instructed. If you want to attend this seminar, please send me an email in August before the seminar enrollment ends to arrange for an appointment to discuss your thesis project. The appointments will take place in September (paivi . pahta  @  uta . fi).

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
7-Sep-2015 – 25-May-2016
Periods: I II III IV
Language of instruction: English

Close reading is a practice of reading literature in a way that allows one, as the name implies, to get closer to the text under analysis. This entails care and attention not only to WHAT a text is saying, but also to HOW the text says it and how one responds as the reader. In close reading, several factors (content, form, interpretation) are combined and put under scrutiny in order to produce readings of literature that transcend first impressions and instead seek to know and learn more about the text at hand.

In this option, we will first look into the tradition and practice of close reading as it has been understood in the history of literary criticism, and we will also consider its role in the advancement of literary theory in the 20th century. (This course is not highly theoretical, but it offers a good foundation for further courses in literary theory and methodology.)

After the background has been provided, the students will work in teams for the rest of the course and carry out a project assignment in close reading. The objective is to be able to work together, with defined tasks for each, choose a text for analysis, identify its vital factors, and negotiate how to present the results to the class. Assessment will be based on one's participation in the project assignment as a whole.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
10-Sep-2015 – 17-Dec-2015
Periods: I II
Language of instruction: English

The course explores selected clausal argument structure constructions in English, and the idea that they carry particular meanings as constructions. It begins with an introduction to basic assumptions and principles in the study of sentential complementation, including the postulation of understood subjects. It then turns to the discussion of selected constructions in English involving sentential complements, with a focus on the matrix verbs selecting them and on the syntactic and semantic properties of the constructions. These include patterns with to infinitives and -ing complements, especially the types of I remembered to mail the letter and I remembered mailing the letter. Authentic data from electronic corpora are made use of in the course.


The course is largely a lecture course, with some homework assignments. Course work includes regular attendance, class participation, a brief essay presented in class on an approved topic, and a final exam. The final exam requires an amount of additional reading, consisting of articles and book chapters on complementation. (These are made available to participants.)

Friday mornings from 8:30 a.m. to 10:40 a.m., with a five-minute break in the middle.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
11-Sep-2015 – 27-Nov-2015
Periods: I II
Language of instruction: English

The course focuses on the analysis of selected structures of sentential complementation in recent English (other than those featured in my Constructions course). These include both object control and some subject control constructions, with some discussion of diachronic changes in recent centuries. Object deletion phenomena are also discussed. Further, attention is devoted to the analysis of innovative or creative uses of selected constructions in current English and to their interpretation. Data are primarily drawn from synchronic and diachronic computer corpora of English.

                      Course work includes regular attendance, class participation, some homework assignments, a brief paper to be presented in class on complementation, and a final exam. The final exam requires some additional reading, consisting of articles and book chapters on complementation. (These are made available to participants.)

                      Time: Fridays from 12:15 p.m. to 1:45 p.m.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
11-Sep-2015 – 27-Nov-2015
Periods: I II
Language of instruction: English

The aim of the course is to give the participants an overall picture of the principles of the study of words. We shall begin by looking at the varieties of English (e.g. geographical, dialectal, social, formal, informal, slang, technical, pejorative) and how these are reflected on the level of vocabulary. The labelling of the different types of variety in dictionaries will also be discussed. After this, the course moves on to examine the main sources of English vocabulary (techniques of word-formation, foreign adoptions). Next, aspects of meaning will be addressed, including the ways in which the meanings of words change along dimensions such as gender (e.g. guy, certain articles of clothing) and pejoration (e.g. idiot, imbecile, moron). We shall finally discuss larger structures pertaining to the lexicon. These may be either paradigmatic relations (e.g. synonymy, polysemy, antonymy, lexical fields, lexical sets) or syntagmatic ones (e.g. collocations).

Course work includes regular attendance of the weekly sessions, homework assignments (practical exercises relating to various aspects of vocabulary), and an essay on a specific topic relating to the study of words.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
11-Sep-2015 – 27-Nov-2015
Periods: I II
Language of instruction: English

This is an introductory survey course that will enable students to understand major research questions and goals in second language acquisition, the extent of current knowledge in this area of inquiry, and how we can view the same questions from different theoretical vantage points. Two of the central questions for discussion will be whether there is a critical period for the native-like acquisition of a second language and the extent to which second language grammars (including systematically occurring non-native errors in syntax, morphology, and phonology) can be directly attributed to the influence of the grammar of the learner's native language.

The course will consist of weekly instruction, weekly readings to be summarized orally by pairs of students, active participation in discussions, short data collection assignments, and a final exam.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
8-Sep-2015 – 15-Dec-2015
Periods: I II
Language of instruction: English

This course will focus on the social aspects of language variation. The first half of the course will be devoted to a detailed discussion of some of the central issues in so-called Labovian sociolinguistics/microsociolinguistics. During the second half of the course the focus will be on a number of sociolinguistic topics including language and ethnicity, language, sex, and gender, language contact and language change.

A reading list will be provided at the beginning of the course.

Course work includes weekly sessions, background reading, oral presentation in the class, and a final essay.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
10-Sep-2015 – 17-Dec-2015
Periods: I II
Language of instruction: English

In this course we will trace the development of detective fiction from the end of the 19th century to the present. We will specifically examine how detective fiction represents and constructs gender, class and ethnicity. For example, we will analyse how Arthur Conan Doyle's detective Sherlock Holmes protects the empire against foreign influence, and how African-American writers (e.g. Pauline Hopkins, Barbara Neely, Walter Mosley) discuss race and crime in their fictions. Further, we will examine how the feminist movement has influenced the field of crime writing - how it introduced new themes into the genre, such as child abuse, sexism, and racism.

Assessment: essay/learning diary, oral presentation and class contribution.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
7-Sep-2015 – 14-Dec-2015
Periods: I II
Language of instruction: English

In this course we will examine the question of murder and representation, with a special focus on gender issues. We will concentrate on one type of murder, serial murder, as a cultural narrative from the end of the 19th century to the present. During this course we will analyze the cultural imagery and social contexts of serial killing in Britain and the United States. In particular, we will try to answer this question: how are gender and "normalcy" constructed through murder narratives, deviation, and crime? We will start with the case of Jack the Ripper - the first "modern" serial killer - and his victims and move on to representations of male and female psychopaths and lesbian serial killing. We will explore such different genres as films and documentary programmes as well as texts written by FBI agents, serial killers and psychiatrists. We will also read three novels: Robert Bloch's Psycho, Bret Easton Ellis' American Psycho, and Helen Zahavi's Dirty Weekend.

Assessment: essay and class contribution.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
8-Sep-2015 – 15-Dec-2015
Periods: I II
Language of instruction: English

This course offers a critical and comprehensive introduction to computer-mediated communication (CMC) and the academic study of digital culture. We will discuss the history of text technologies from manuscripts to smart phones and hypertext, investigate how the concepts of reading and writing have changed over the centuries and are changing right now, explore how well traditional linguistic and discourse analytical models can be applied to digital discourses, carry out our own analyses of digital media, and discover how English is changing as a result of the borderless and unedited nature of online communication. The students will be encouraged to suggest timely topics for discussion and to make use of their own experiences with digital media.

The course work will involve background reading, in-class discussions, group work and online interaction.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
7-Sep-2015 – 14-Dec-2015
Periods: I II
Language of instruction: English

This course will address the question “What is Scottish Literature?” by examining the works of key authors from the Middle Ages to the present day to identify the social, historical, and cultural contexts and significant themes that have defined the Scottish literary canon. We will explore themes such as religion, duality, fantasy and the supernatural, language, and gender, and investigate the contributions of Scots, Gaelic, and Nordic cultures to identify the diverse influences that have shaped Scottish culture through the centuries. We will also discuss the theoretical controversies and social conflicts that have informed debate over the construction of the Scottish literary canon.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
7-Sep-2015 – 14-Dec-2015
Periods: I II
Language of instruction: English

This course will examine the development of British drama from the late seventeenth and eighteenth-century. Studying a selection of plays from genres including comedy, tragedy, satire, and ballad-opera, and attending to changes in the staging conventions of the period, we will examine the historical and social contexts of the drama and look at the theatre as a site of political and social debate that engaged with topics such as gender and power, imperialism, British identity, and political corruption.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
8-Sep-2015 – 15-Dec-2015
Periods: I II
Language of instruction: English

This course reviews linguistic as well as various socio-cultural aspects of English as a global language, paying attention to both theory and practice. The course has three main aims. Firstly, it briefly outlines the development and characteristics of English as a global language – the variation, change and diversification of English in different regions, societies, communities and settings in the world – with specific emphasis on non-native-speaker contexts. Secondly, the course provides a critical overview of issues around and debates on the impact of the spread of English in the world. Thirdly, it familiarizes students with a range of linguistic and discourse-pragmatic approaches to studying English as a global language, also providing suggestions and support for pro gradu research in this area. Course work includes weekly sessions, background reading, and a mini project, its oral presentation and written report.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
9-Sep-2015 – 16-Dec-2015
Periods: I II
Language of instruction: English

Modernity is associated with the disenchantment of the world, the dissolution of myths and the destruction of grand narratives. Theorists have debated whether aesthetic modernism can be viewed as a fitting response to the pessimism inherent in modernity or a nihilistic pursuit in itself. We will examine a number of past and contemporary poems, plays, novels and short stories that reflect the perceived meaninglessness of modern life. The texts will include selections from the Earl of Rochester and Alexander Pope to Samuel Beckett and Cormac McCarthy. Assessment: class participation, group work, essay.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
8-Sep-2015 – 15-Dec-2015
Periods: I II
Language of instruction: English

Satire is a critical genre that tests the limits of good taste and freedom of speech. The role of public ridicule in society and the rights of satirists have been debated since antiquity, which has generated an extensive theoretical literature around the topic. The course will include a variety of examples of satire from the Enlightenment to modernism and postmodernism. In addition to literary texts, we will also examine contemporary examples of satire from television, film and new media. After the course, students will be familiar with a number of theoretical approaches to satire and have a grasp of the history of the genre. Assessment: class participation, short presentations, essay.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
7-Sep-2015 – 14-Dec-2015
Periods: I II
Language of instruction: English
Period (11-Jan-2016 - 6-Mar-2016)
Syventävät opinnot [Period III]

Lecturer Norri’s seminar

My seminar is primarily meant for students who are interested in doing research on English vocabulary, English word-formation, dictionaries of English, and English for Specific Purposes (English as used in various types of scientific writing). In seminar papers dealing with vocabulary, it is possible to concentrate either on Present-day English or on chronological developments in English vocabulary and dictionaries of English. The following are some examples of topics covered in recent MA theses: film-related neologisms in the magazine Total Film; slogans used in refractive surgery advertising; the offensiveness and usage of the lexemes bitch and son of a bitch; insulting nationality words in some British and American dictionaries and in the British National Corpus.

In the autumn term, we will concentrate on finding a topic for you to write on and on putting together a research proposal (circa five to ten pages). Practical questions relating to the writing of an MA thesis will also be addressed, as will various ways of finding research material for your study (corpora and other electronic sources, printed books, etc.).

During the spring term, students are expected to write a seminar paper (approximately twenty pages, but longer contributions are also welcome), to be presented and discussed in our meetings. The seminar paper is usually a first draft of the MA thesis, and our purpose should be to lay a solid foundation for the final thesis in our sessions, ideally completing a significant portion of the thesis in the course of the academic year.

To apply for a place in my seminar, please act according to the instructions. I would appreciate it if those who are interested in attending the seminar sent me an email (juhani.norri@uta.fi) to arrange for an appointment before the seminar officially begins. It would be good to discuss your topic and your approach to it as early as possible. (My summer holiday runs from July 13th till August 16th; meetings are possible both before and after it.)

Lecturer Piipponen’s Seminar

This seminar is open for students interested in literary analysis and cultural studies. I would like to recommend this seminar especially for those students who are interested in women’s writing and gender/queer studies, popular literature (especially detective fiction), the study of genres and generic conventions, American literature (1900-), and literary works dealing with imperialism, postcolonialism and ethnicity.

During the autumn, participants start working on their thesis and write a research proposal in which they specify the primary material, research question and theoretical approach of the thesis (approximately five pages); the proposal is then presented to and discussed by the seminar group. During the spring, participants continue their work and present their seminar paper (which ideally consists of one or two chapters of the actual thesis). The goal of the seminar is to acquire the knowledge and skills needed to complete the thesis and to offer support and practical advice during the writing process. Besides the seminar sessions, also individual consultation sessions will be arranged according to the needs of the participants.

To apply for a place, please act as instructed; if you want to start working on your thesis before the autumn, please send me an email as soon as possible (maarit.piipponen@uta.fi).

Professor Klemola's Seminar

Linguistics, especially language variation and change

My seminar is open for students interested in all kinds of linguistics topics. However, I would recommend the seminar especially for those students who are interested in corpus-based studies of variation and change in English. Possible seminar (and pro gradu) projects may focus, for example, on grammatical variation in regional varieties of English. The study of regional variation in English is facilitated by the recent International Corpus of English (ICE) family of corpora, which provide an easy access to a wide range of varieties of English from all over the English-speaking world.

The main task during the autumn term will be to write and present a research proposal (five to ten pages). In addition, each student will be expected to draft—in consultation with me—a personal study and research plan for the whole academic year. We will also focus on practical questions linked with writing a thesis, look at some examples of recent gradus completed in the English department, and read a number of articles linked with the topics you are working on.

During the spring term, each student will write a seminar paper (20+ pages), to be presented and discussed in the group. Ideally, the seminar paper will function as the first draft of your pro gradu thesis.

Lecturer McGinley's Seminar

This course is for students interested in literary study and is designed to help in writing your MA thesis and to give experience of academic literary analysis, discussion and debate. Throughout the course there will be classes addressing research methods, style, structure, and composition. But the predominant emphasis will be on the actual writing of your thesis. The first half of the course will see you defining your topic and submitting an abstract for discussion with your supervisor early in the course, and building towards a presentation of the thesis proposal (12-15 pages) and discussion of it with other students. The second half of the course will involve writing a draft of your thesis (about 5000-7000 words), and again presenting it to the class for comment and discussion. During the presentation sessions, each student will also serve as commentator on another student’s thesis, giving constructive feedback on the presentation before the discussion is opened and the other students invited to share their thoughts. Assessment will be by completion of assignments (abstracts, research proposals, and thesis drafts) and ‘participation’, which will include attendance, fulfillment of all presentation requirements, performance as commentator, and contribution to class discussions.

Professor Pahta's Seminar

Language in context, genre and discourse studies, applied linguistics

This seminar runs for the next calendar year, starting in January 2016. The seminar is intended for students who are interested in analyzing language use in context, i.e. in relation to various language-external factors, using qualitative or quantitative methods, including discourse analysis or corpus linguistics. The students’ interests can relate, for example, to English in specific social or situational contexts, English as a global language in non-Anglophone contexts, bi- and multilingualism, computer-mediated communication, or language use in the history of English. Students interested in studying English in the context of learning and teaching are also welcome.

The seminar offers practical advice, guidance and support during the process of planning and writing the thesis, addressing each step in the research process. As working methods we will use collaborative group work, including discussions of relevant reading and the students’ own projects, and a course diary.

During the spring term, students are expected to produce a research proposal, specifying the main elements of their pro gradu thesis, to present it to the seminar group, and to start working on their thesis. In the autumn term, students continue to work on their thesis. The aim during the seminar year is to finish a draft version of the entire thesis; the minimum requirement is to produce at least 3-4 draft chapters of the thesis, serving as “the seminar paper”. Towards the end of the seminar year, each student’s thesis draft is discussed in class.

To apply for a place, please act as instructed. If you want to attend this seminar, please send me an email in August before the seminar enrollment ends to arrange for an appointment to discuss your thesis project. The appointments will take place in September (paivi . pahta  @  uta . fi).

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
7-Sep-2015 – 25-May-2016
Periods: I II III IV
Language of instruction: English
Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
12-Jan-2016 – 26-Apr-2016
Periods: III IV
Language of instruction: English

The course will consist of lectures (for all participants) in the first period with associated tutorials (2 groups) in the second period.

The aim is to learn to read theoretical texts, some of which are highly complex, and discover their line of argumentation. An important part of the effort is to become aware of the historical dialogue in which the theories are engaged, and to understand how one might take part in it.

The course will touch on the fields of New Criticism, structuralism, Marxism, psychoanalysis, feminism, poststructuralism, deconstruction, the New Historicism, cultural materialism, postcolonial and queer theory, as well as recent developments in ecocriticism and cognitive poetics.

Each student is expected to purchase Hans Bertens: Literary Theory: The Basics (3rd ed., 2014), which will provide preliminary reading for each lecture.

In the tutorials, students will work in teams to apply the methods learned to literary texts and see how readings change according to theoretical position, broadening one's view of the text. Assessment will be based on class participation and a process learning diary.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
12-Jan-2016 – 4-May-2016
Periods: III IV
Language of instruction: English

This course focuses on standard methods of studying text and discourse, and theories behind them, including both qualitative and quantitative methods of analyzing language use in its social context (e.g. critical discourse analysis, computer-mediated discourse analysis, and corpus-assisted discourse studies). The course readings include some classic studies and latest research in the field, and hands-on projects will familiarize students with the empirical analysis of text and discourse in practice. Course work includes weekly sessions, background readings, independent study, an oral presentation in the class, and a final essay (project paper).

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
12-Jan-2016 – 26-Apr-2016
Periods: III IV
Language of instruction: English

The course aims at exposing some of the many roles that the city, as a specific source of human experience, has played in literature from the nineteenth to the twenty-first century. To some extent, the course also explores literature’s influence on how individual cities are seen and understood. Our analysis will make use of a number of viewpoints, some of them solidly rooted in socio-historical conditions and others more clearly based on metaphorical (or metonymical) approaches to the city. In addition to examining several stories set in well-known cities, we will take a look at urban studies as a field and find ways of using its perspectives in readings of literary texts.

During the last few weeks of the course, students will give presentations on a literary or cinematic text not included in course materials.

Assessment: class participation, a group presentation, and a course diary.

Note: If you have taken the Literary Landscapes course in or before 2013, there will be some overlap, as previously that course also touched upon city literature.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
13-Jan-2016 – 27-Apr-2016
Periods: III IV
Language of instruction: English

Since Freud's ventures into literary aesthetics in the early 1900s, psychoanalysis and psychoanalytical criticism has provided, often quite controversially, plenty of food for thought in the study of literature. Over the years, theorists such as Jacques Lacan, Melanie Klein, Julia Kristeva, and Shoshana Felman have applied different approaches to shed light on the unpredictable workings of the human psyche and its effects on behaviour. On this course, we will study important texts written in this tradition to gauge their relevance in the reading of authors such as William Wordsworth, Edgar Allan Poe, and Henry James.

Methods of study include some lecturing, but mostly we will proceed in the form of a reading circle and team/pair work. An active role is therefore encouraged to get the full gain of the course. Assessment will be based on class participation and a process writing assignment.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
15-Jan-2016 – 6-May-2016
Periods: III IV
Language of instruction: English

This option will present students with an extensive coverage of the different ways in which new words are formed in English. The course will begin by a survey of the basic concepts relating to word-formation and morphology (affix, derivation, root, base, lexeme, opaqueness, transparency etc.). We shall then move on to examine the many different processes by which new words are formed in English (e.g. derivation, compounding, blending, clipping, sound-symbolism). The course ends with two relatively recent ways of putting together new words (cut-down puns and knock-knock words).

Course work includes regular attendance of the weekly sessions, homework assignments (theory handouts and practical exercises relating to various aspects of word-formation), and an end-of-term examination.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
15-Jan-2016 – 27-May-2016
Periods: III IV
Language of instruction: English

This is an introduction to linguistic pragmatics, with a particular focus on a range of information- structuring processes in informal native English discourse. This involves the foregrounding and backgrounding of elements within utterances, involving non-canonical word order (including clefting, topicalization, and left/right dislocation), the insertion of discourse particles (such as the infamous originally American English "like"), and intonational strategies. We will also look at how these pragmatic alternations are interpreted by non-native speakers, how competing strategies from other languages (including Finnish) may be transferred into non-native English usage, and how these competing strategies may persist in "ethnic" native varieties of English.

The course will consist of weekly instruction, weekly readings to be summarized orally by pairs of students, active participation in discussions, short data collection assignments, and a final exam.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
18-Jan-2016 – 23-May-2016
Periods: III IV
Language of instruction: English

Most people in the world speak two or more languages. Language contact is thus a ubiquitous phenomenon which entails a wide range of social, political and linguistic consequences. This course provides a survey of English as a contact language, focusing on both historical and present-day contact varieties of English. Topics to be discussed during the course include Bilingualism and Multilingualism, Code-Switching, Contact-Induced Language Change, Second Language Acquisition and Language Shift, Language Death, Pidgins and Creoles.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
14-Jan-2016 – 26-May-2016
Periods: III IV
Language of instruction: English

General Description

This course will provide insights into Gothic Fiction, ranging from the emergence of the mode – the late eighteenth-century England – to the present day. Besides examining historical, theoretical, and critical perspectives that have arisen in relation to this mode, we will examine the role of time in Gothic Fiction. Particular focus will be placed on how temporal motifs allude to alternative meanings and realities, discussing connections such as between monstrosity and ethnicity, or vampires and gender.

We will read theoretical and critical texts on the Gothic, as well as excerpts from Gothic short stories and novels, including Frankenstein, A Christmas Carol, and Dracula. In addition, we will be viewing Jim Jarmusch's film Only Lovers Left Alive (2013).

Assessment: class participation, group assignments, final essay of 2500 words OR a course diary

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
13-Jan-2016 – 4-May-2016
Periods: III IV
Language of instruction: English

While science fiction often takes place in societies far away in the future or on distant planets, it often also says something critical about contemporary societies. During this course we will take a closer look at some of the recurring themes that sf criticizes and examine what kinds of tools it uses to criticize these issues. We will also consider what the purpose or effect of the criticism might be: Is sf activism or mere escapism? The reading will consist of a combination of fictional and theoretical texts. The main focus will be on science fiction written in the past 50 years, but we will also touch on recent sf television and film. 

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
15-Jan-2016 – 29-Apr-2016
Periods: III IV
Language of instruction: English

Drug literature is perhaps not the most respectable of literary genres, but like any other literary genre it has a history, notable authors and generic conventions. Its unique feature is that it has clearly influenced the way we see drugs, drug abuse and addiction in the modern world. The course focuses on autobiographical texts about drug use from Thomas De Quincey's Confessions of an English Opium-Eater (1821) and Fitz Hugh Ludlow's The Hasheesh Eater (1857) to psychedelic trip reports found on various Internet forums dedicated to the subject. The course proceeds chronologically from the Romantic period to the present day. In terms of theory, it examines, among other things, the concept of experience and the relationship between experience and representation in literature. Special emphasis is given to the many social issues surrounding drug use. Assessment: class participation, presentation, essay.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
13-Jan-2016 – 4-May-2016
Periods: III IV
Language of instruction: English
Period (7-Mar-2016 - 29-May-2016)
Syventävät opinnot [Period IV]

Lecturer Norri’s seminar

My seminar is primarily meant for students who are interested in doing research on English vocabulary, English word-formation, dictionaries of English, and English for Specific Purposes (English as used in various types of scientific writing). In seminar papers dealing with vocabulary, it is possible to concentrate either on Present-day English or on chronological developments in English vocabulary and dictionaries of English. The following are some examples of topics covered in recent MA theses: film-related neologisms in the magazine Total Film; slogans used in refractive surgery advertising; the offensiveness and usage of the lexemes bitch and son of a bitch; insulting nationality words in some British and American dictionaries and in the British National Corpus.

In the autumn term, we will concentrate on finding a topic for you to write on and on putting together a research proposal (circa five to ten pages). Practical questions relating to the writing of an MA thesis will also be addressed, as will various ways of finding research material for your study (corpora and other electronic sources, printed books, etc.).

During the spring term, students are expected to write a seminar paper (approximately twenty pages, but longer contributions are also welcome), to be presented and discussed in our meetings. The seminar paper is usually a first draft of the MA thesis, and our purpose should be to lay a solid foundation for the final thesis in our sessions, ideally completing a significant portion of the thesis in the course of the academic year.

To apply for a place in my seminar, please act according to the instructions. I would appreciate it if those who are interested in attending the seminar sent me an email (juhani.norri@uta.fi) to arrange for an appointment before the seminar officially begins. It would be good to discuss your topic and your approach to it as early as possible. (My summer holiday runs from July 13th till August 16th; meetings are possible both before and after it.)

Lecturer Piipponen’s Seminar

This seminar is open for students interested in literary analysis and cultural studies. I would like to recommend this seminar especially for those students who are interested in women’s writing and gender/queer studies, popular literature (especially detective fiction), the study of genres and generic conventions, American literature (1900-), and literary works dealing with imperialism, postcolonialism and ethnicity.

During the autumn, participants start working on their thesis and write a research proposal in which they specify the primary material, research question and theoretical approach of the thesis (approximately five pages); the proposal is then presented to and discussed by the seminar group. During the spring, participants continue their work and present their seminar paper (which ideally consists of one or two chapters of the actual thesis). The goal of the seminar is to acquire the knowledge and skills needed to complete the thesis and to offer support and practical advice during the writing process. Besides the seminar sessions, also individual consultation sessions will be arranged according to the needs of the participants.

To apply for a place, please act as instructed; if you want to start working on your thesis before the autumn, please send me an email as soon as possible (maarit.piipponen@uta.fi).

Professor Klemola's Seminar

Linguistics, especially language variation and change

My seminar is open for students interested in all kinds of linguistics topics. However, I would recommend the seminar especially for those students who are interested in corpus-based studies of variation and change in English. Possible seminar (and pro gradu) projects may focus, for example, on grammatical variation in regional varieties of English. The study of regional variation in English is facilitated by the recent International Corpus of English (ICE) family of corpora, which provide an easy access to a wide range of varieties of English from all over the English-speaking world.

The main task during the autumn term will be to write and present a research proposal (five to ten pages). In addition, each student will be expected to draft—in consultation with me—a personal study and research plan for the whole academic year. We will also focus on practical questions linked with writing a thesis, look at some examples of recent gradus completed in the English department, and read a number of articles linked with the topics you are working on.

During the spring term, each student will write a seminar paper (20+ pages), to be presented and discussed in the group. Ideally, the seminar paper will function as the first draft of your pro gradu thesis.

Lecturer McGinley's Seminar

This course is for students interested in literary study and is designed to help in writing your MA thesis and to give experience of academic literary analysis, discussion and debate. Throughout the course there will be classes addressing research methods, style, structure, and composition. But the predominant emphasis will be on the actual writing of your thesis. The first half of the course will see you defining your topic and submitting an abstract for discussion with your supervisor early in the course, and building towards a presentation of the thesis proposal (12-15 pages) and discussion of it with other students. The second half of the course will involve writing a draft of your thesis (about 5000-7000 words), and again presenting it to the class for comment and discussion. During the presentation sessions, each student will also serve as commentator on another student’s thesis, giving constructive feedback on the presentation before the discussion is opened and the other students invited to share their thoughts. Assessment will be by completion of assignments (abstracts, research proposals, and thesis drafts) and ‘participation’, which will include attendance, fulfillment of all presentation requirements, performance as commentator, and contribution to class discussions.

Professor Pahta's Seminar

Language in context, genre and discourse studies, applied linguistics

This seminar runs for the next calendar year, starting in January 2016. The seminar is intended for students who are interested in analyzing language use in context, i.e. in relation to various language-external factors, using qualitative or quantitative methods, including discourse analysis or corpus linguistics. The students’ interests can relate, for example, to English in specific social or situational contexts, English as a global language in non-Anglophone contexts, bi- and multilingualism, computer-mediated communication, or language use in the history of English. Students interested in studying English in the context of learning and teaching are also welcome.

The seminar offers practical advice, guidance and support during the process of planning and writing the thesis, addressing each step in the research process. As working methods we will use collaborative group work, including discussions of relevant reading and the students’ own projects, and a course diary.

During the spring term, students are expected to produce a research proposal, specifying the main elements of their pro gradu thesis, to present it to the seminar group, and to start working on their thesis. In the autumn term, students continue to work on their thesis. The aim during the seminar year is to finish a draft version of the entire thesis; the minimum requirement is to produce at least 3-4 draft chapters of the thesis, serving as “the seminar paper”. Towards the end of the seminar year, each student’s thesis draft is discussed in class.

To apply for a place, please act as instructed. If you want to attend this seminar, please send me an email in August before the seminar enrollment ends to arrange for an appointment to discuss your thesis project. The appointments will take place in September (paivi . pahta  @  uta . fi).

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
7-Sep-2015 – 25-May-2016
Periods: I II III IV
Language of instruction: English
Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
12-Jan-2016 – 26-Apr-2016
Periods: III IV
Language of instruction: English

The course will consist of lectures (for all participants) in the first period with associated tutorials (2 groups) in the second period.

The aim is to learn to read theoretical texts, some of which are highly complex, and discover their line of argumentation. An important part of the effort is to become aware of the historical dialogue in which the theories are engaged, and to understand how one might take part in it.

The course will touch on the fields of New Criticism, structuralism, Marxism, psychoanalysis, feminism, poststructuralism, deconstruction, the New Historicism, cultural materialism, postcolonial and queer theory, as well as recent developments in ecocriticism and cognitive poetics.

Each student is expected to purchase Hans Bertens: Literary Theory: The Basics (3rd ed., 2014), which will provide preliminary reading for each lecture.

In the tutorials, students will work in teams to apply the methods learned to literary texts and see how readings change according to theoretical position, broadening one's view of the text. Assessment will be based on class participation and a process learning diary.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
12-Jan-2016 – 4-May-2016
Periods: III IV
Language of instruction: English

This course focuses on standard methods of studying text and discourse, and theories behind them, including both qualitative and quantitative methods of analyzing language use in its social context (e.g. critical discourse analysis, computer-mediated discourse analysis, and corpus-assisted discourse studies). The course readings include some classic studies and latest research in the field, and hands-on projects will familiarize students with the empirical analysis of text and discourse in practice. Course work includes weekly sessions, background readings, independent study, an oral presentation in the class, and a final essay (project paper).

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
12-Jan-2016 – 26-Apr-2016
Periods: III IV
Language of instruction: English

The course aims at exposing some of the many roles that the city, as a specific source of human experience, has played in literature from the nineteenth to the twenty-first century. To some extent, the course also explores literature’s influence on how individual cities are seen and understood. Our analysis will make use of a number of viewpoints, some of them solidly rooted in socio-historical conditions and others more clearly based on metaphorical (or metonymical) approaches to the city. In addition to examining several stories set in well-known cities, we will take a look at urban studies as a field and find ways of using its perspectives in readings of literary texts.

During the last few weeks of the course, students will give presentations on a literary or cinematic text not included in course materials.

Assessment: class participation, a group presentation, and a course diary.

Note: If you have taken the Literary Landscapes course in or before 2013, there will be some overlap, as previously that course also touched upon city literature.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
13-Jan-2016 – 27-Apr-2016
Periods: III IV
Language of instruction: English

Since Freud's ventures into literary aesthetics in the early 1900s, psychoanalysis and psychoanalytical criticism has provided, often quite controversially, plenty of food for thought in the study of literature. Over the years, theorists such as Jacques Lacan, Melanie Klein, Julia Kristeva, and Shoshana Felman have applied different approaches to shed light on the unpredictable workings of the human psyche and its effects on behaviour. On this course, we will study important texts written in this tradition to gauge their relevance in the reading of authors such as William Wordsworth, Edgar Allan Poe, and Henry James.

Methods of study include some lecturing, but mostly we will proceed in the form of a reading circle and team/pair work. An active role is therefore encouraged to get the full gain of the course. Assessment will be based on class participation and a process writing assignment.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
15-Jan-2016 – 6-May-2016
Periods: III IV
Language of instruction: English

This option will present students with an extensive coverage of the different ways in which new words are formed in English. The course will begin by a survey of the basic concepts relating to word-formation and morphology (affix, derivation, root, base, lexeme, opaqueness, transparency etc.). We shall then move on to examine the many different processes by which new words are formed in English (e.g. derivation, compounding, blending, clipping, sound-symbolism). The course ends with two relatively recent ways of putting together new words (cut-down puns and knock-knock words).

Course work includes regular attendance of the weekly sessions, homework assignments (theory handouts and practical exercises relating to various aspects of word-formation), and an end-of-term examination.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
15-Jan-2016 – 27-May-2016
Periods: III IV
Language of instruction: English

This is an introduction to linguistic pragmatics, with a particular focus on a range of information- structuring processes in informal native English discourse. This involves the foregrounding and backgrounding of elements within utterances, involving non-canonical word order (including clefting, topicalization, and left/right dislocation), the insertion of discourse particles (such as the infamous originally American English "like"), and intonational strategies. We will also look at how these pragmatic alternations are interpreted by non-native speakers, how competing strategies from other languages (including Finnish) may be transferred into non-native English usage, and how these competing strategies may persist in "ethnic" native varieties of English.

The course will consist of weekly instruction, weekly readings to be summarized orally by pairs of students, active participation in discussions, short data collection assignments, and a final exam.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
18-Jan-2016 – 23-May-2016
Periods: III IV
Language of instruction: English

Most people in the world speak two or more languages. Language contact is thus a ubiquitous phenomenon which entails a wide range of social, political and linguistic consequences. This course provides a survey of English as a contact language, focusing on both historical and present-day contact varieties of English. Topics to be discussed during the course include Bilingualism and Multilingualism, Code-Switching, Contact-Induced Language Change, Second Language Acquisition and Language Shift, Language Death, Pidgins and Creoles.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
14-Jan-2016 – 26-May-2016
Periods: III IV
Language of instruction: English

General Description

This course will provide insights into Gothic Fiction, ranging from the emergence of the mode – the late eighteenth-century England – to the present day. Besides examining historical, theoretical, and critical perspectives that have arisen in relation to this mode, we will examine the role of time in Gothic Fiction. Particular focus will be placed on how temporal motifs allude to alternative meanings and realities, discussing connections such as between monstrosity and ethnicity, or vampires and gender.

We will read theoretical and critical texts on the Gothic, as well as excerpts from Gothic short stories and novels, including Frankenstein, A Christmas Carol, and Dracula. In addition, we will be viewing Jim Jarmusch's film Only Lovers Left Alive (2013).

Assessment: class participation, group assignments, final essay of 2500 words OR a course diary

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
13-Jan-2016 – 4-May-2016
Periods: III IV
Language of instruction: English

While science fiction often takes place in societies far away in the future or on distant planets, it often also says something critical about contemporary societies. During this course we will take a closer look at some of the recurring themes that sf criticizes and examine what kinds of tools it uses to criticize these issues. We will also consider what the purpose or effect of the criticism might be: Is sf activism or mere escapism? The reading will consist of a combination of fictional and theoretical texts. The main focus will be on science fiction written in the past 50 years, but we will also touch on recent sf television and film. 

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
15-Jan-2016 – 29-Apr-2016
Periods: III IV
Language of instruction: English

Drug literature is perhaps not the most respectable of literary genres, but like any other literary genre it has a history, notable authors and generic conventions. Its unique feature is that it has clearly influenced the way we see drugs, drug abuse and addiction in the modern world. The course focuses on autobiographical texts about drug use from Thomas De Quincey's Confessions of an English Opium-Eater (1821) and Fitz Hugh Ludlow's The Hasheesh Eater (1857) to psychedelic trip reports found on various Internet forums dedicated to the subject. The course proceeds chronologically from the Romantic period to the present day. In terms of theory, it examines, among other things, the concept of experience and the relationship between experience and representation in literature. Special emphasis is given to the many social issues surrounding drug use. Assessment: class participation, presentation, essay.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
13-Jan-2016 – 4-May-2016
Periods: III IV
Language of instruction: English

This course will focus on the language and discourse of written media such as newspapers and magazines, as well as such audio and visual media as advertisements, documentary and dramatised television programs, music videos, film, and the internet. Focusing on popular media, particularly in advertising, information, and entertainment, the course aims at the understanding of the nature of rhetoric in its varied roles in popular discourse; the comprehension of various media and their interaction with their audiences; and the close examination of specific language features in written, audio, and visual media.

Course requirements

Pair/group project and presentation; active class participation.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Teaching
15-Mar-2016 – 26-May-2016
Periods: IV
Language of instruction: English