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Arkistoitu opetusohjelma 2018–2019
Selaat vanhentunutta opetusohjelmaa. Voimassa olevan opetusohjelman löydät täältä.
Englannin kielen ja kirjallisuuden maisteriopinnot

Periodit

I Periodi (27.8.2018 – 21.10.2018)
III Periodi (7.1.2019 – 3.3.2019)
IV Periodi (4.3.2019 – 26.5.2019)

Staff contact information

Course enrolment

Course enrolment is predominantly done through the electronic enrolment system in NettiOpsu. A good way to enrol on courses is by browsing the teaching schedule and using the Enrol buttons in course descriptions. This way you can be certain that you get all the necessary information about the course and any special enrolment procedures.

Enrolment times

Autumn theme courses 1.-21.8.

Spring theme courses 19.11.-4.12.

Enrolment for other courses starting in period I: 20.-30.8.

Enrolment for othercourses starting in period II: 1.-11.10.

Enrolment for othercourses starting in period III: 3.-13.12.

Enrolment for othercourses starting in period IV: 11.2.-21.2.

Rules for how students are selected onto courses (in Finnish).

Theme course enrolment

What are Theme courses? Theme courses are alternative courses in English Language and Literature Advanced Studies.

Autumn and spring theme courses have separate enrolment, see enrolment times above. Students will be selected onto theme courses on the day after the enrolment time ends. After student selection there will be a fixed period when we want you to cancel your enrolment if you have been selected onto more theme courses than you wish to take. This period will be 23th to 29th August for autumn theme courses and 6th to 12th December for spring theme courses. You will be reminded. (Cancellations will be by email to the degree programme Study Coordinator)

Book exams etc.

Information on book exams, essays and other independent study alternatives.

Breaks in contact teahcing

There will be a break week in English basic and intermediate studies and English language and literature advanced studies at the end of periods I and III i.e. 15.-21.10 and 25.2.-3.3.

Dropping out of courses

If a student has registered for a course but will not be taking it, he/she must cancel his/her registration by the set date before the course begins so that another student may take the course instead.

If a student does not participate in the course and does not cancel his/her enrolment, or if he/she discontinues the course, he/she will be assigned a fail grade for the course in question.

In the English degree programme students must cancel their registration within a week from the course’s first meeting.

Teaching schedule preview information

A teaching schedule planning document, which has information on teaching before that information is published here.

Periodi (27.8.2018 - 21.10.2018)
Syventävät opinnot [I Periodi]

The lectures and tutorials will be held on alternate weeks. Exact dates will be announced later.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Kevin McGinley, Teacher responsible
Kevin.McGinley[ät]uta.fi
Teaching
4-Sep-2018 – 11-Dec-2018
Lectures
Tue 4-Sep-2018 - 11-Dec-2018 weekly at 16-18, Pinni B 4113
Tutorials
Group 1
Mon 10-Sep-2018 - 10-Dec-2018 weekly at 10-12, Päätalo A31
Group 2
Tue 11-Sep-2018 - 11-Dec-2018 weekly at 16-18, Pinni B 4117
Periods: I II
Language of instruction: English

Professor Klemola's Seminar

This seminar is open for all students who are interested in linguistic topics. However, I would recommend the seminar especially for students who are interested in corpus-based studies of variation and change in English. Possible seminar (and pro gradu) projects may focus, for example, on grammatical variation in World Englishes. The following titles exemplify the kinds of topics covered in recent MA theses: ‘Damn funny la! ̶ A Comparative Corpus Study on Intensifiers in Singapore English’; ‘A painful divorce or the opportunity of a lifetime? Metaphor in political speeches in Scottish independence referendum campaigns’; ‘Colouring the News – Hypocoristics of Nouns in Selected New Zealand Newspapers between 1996 and 2012’.

The main task during the autumn term will be to write and present a research proposal (five to ten pages). In addition, each student will be expected to draft—in consultation with me—a personal study and research plan for the whole academic year. We will also focus on practical questions linked with writing a thesis, look at some examples of recent gradus completed in the English department, and read a number of articles linked with the topics you are working on.

During the spring term, each student will write a seminar paper (20+ pages), to be presented and discussed in the group. Ideally, the seminar paper will function as the first draft of your pro gradu thesis.

Assessment will be by completion of assignments and participation in the class (attendance, fulfillment of all presentation requirements, performance as commentator, and contribution to class discussions).

Lecturer McGinley's Seminar

This course is designed to help you in writing your MA thesis and to give experience of academic discussion and debate. The first half of the course will see you define your topic and submitting an abstract for discussion with your supervisor early in the course, and building towards a presentation of the thesis proposal (around 8-12 pages) and discussion of it with other students. The second half of the course will involve writing a draft of your thesis (6000-8000 words), and again presenting it to the class for comment and discussion. During the presentation sessions, each student will also serve as commentator on another student's thesis, giving constructive feedback on the presentation before the discussion will is open and the other students invited to share their thoughts. In addition, individual consultations will be arranged with the tutor. Assessment will be on the basis of assignments, attendance, and participation in class.

Associate Professor Riquet's Seminar

This thesis seminar is especially recommended to students interested in literary spaces, the links between literature and geography, ecocriticism, travel writing, magic and the supernatural in fiction, phenomenology, deconstruction, and cinema, but students working on other topics are also welcome.

In the first semester, you will develop a concise abstract (300 words) and a detailed research proposal (5-8 pages) for your project; in the second semester, you will first submit a draft chapter (6000-8000 words) before writing the thesis itself. Throughout the seminar, we will discuss important questions pertaining to research techniques and methodologies as well as academic writing and style. We will also occasionally read texts written by established academics in order to discuss the problems and challenges they encountered and the solutions they found; in this way, we will familiarise ourselves with a variety of models and approaches to research in the field of literary and cultural studies.

At each stage, students will present their projects to the class and get feedback from each other. Active participation on the part of all students is therefore an indispensable part of the seminar. Students will be assessed on the basis of the different assignments, attendance, and participation in class.

Professor Nevala's Seminar

Language in context, discourse studies, applied linguistics

The seminar is intended for students who are interested in analyzing language use in context, i.e. in relation to various language-external factors, using qualitative or quantitative methods, including discourse analysis or corpus linguistics. The students’ interests can relate, for example, to English in specific social or situational contexts, bi- and multilingualism, computer-mediated communication, or language use in the history of English. Students interested in studying English in the context of learning and teaching are also welcome.

The seminar offers practical advice, guidance and support during the process of planning and writing the thesis, addressing each step in the research process. As working methods we will use collaborative group work, including discussions of relevant reading and the students’ own projects.

During the first term, students are expected to produce a research proposal, specifying the main elements of their pro gradu thesis, to present it to the seminar group, and to start working on their thesis. In the second term, students continue to work on their thesis. The aim during the seminar year is to finish a draft version of the entire thesis; the minimum requirement is to produce at least 1-2 draft chapters of the thesis, serving as “the seminar paper”. Towards the end of the seminar year, each student’s thesis draft will be discussed in class.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Minna Nevala, Teacher responsible
Minna.Nevala[ät]uta.fi
Kevin McGinley, Teacher responsible
Kevin.McGinley[ät]uta.fi
Juhani Klemola, Teacher responsible
Juhani.Klemola[ät]uta.fi
Johannes Riquet, Teacher responsible
Johannes.Riquet[ät]uta.fi
Teaching
12-Sep-2018 – 22-May-2019
Tutorials
Group 1 (Klemola, linguistics)
Wed 12-Sep-2018 - 10-Oct-2018 weekly at 10-12, Pinni B 2078
Wed 24-Oct-2018 - 12-Dec-2018 weekly at 10-12, Pinni B 2078
Wed 9-Jan-2019 - 20-Feb-2019 weekly at 10-12, Pinni B 5005
Wed 6-Mar-2019 - 22-May-2019 weekly at 10-12, Pinni B 5005
Group 2 (Nevala, linguistics)
Wed 12-Sep-2018 - 10-Oct-2018 weekly at 14-16, Päätalo C2
Wed 24-Oct-2018 - 12-Dec-2018 weekly at 14-16, Päätalo C2
Wed 9-Jan-2019 - 20-Feb-2019 weekly at 14-16, Pinni B 4086
Wed 6-Mar-2019 - 22-May-2019 weekly at 14-16, Pinni B 4086
Group 3 (McGinley, literature)
Wed 12-Sep-2018 - 10-Oct-2018 weekly at 16-18, Pinni B 4086
Wed 24-Oct-2018 - 12-Dec-2018 weekly at 16-18, Pinni B 4086
Wed 9-Jan-2019 - 20-Feb-2019 weekly at 16-18, Pinni B 4086
Wed 6-Mar-2019 - 22-May-2019 weekly at 16-18, Pinni B 4086
Group 4 (Riquet, literature)
Wed 12-Sep-2018 - 10-Oct-2018 weekly at 14-16, Päätalo C1
Wed 24-Oct-2018 - 12-Dec-2018 weekly at 14-16, Päätalo C1
Wed 9-Jan-2019 - 20-Feb-2019 weekly at 14-16, Pinni B 5005
Wed 6-Mar-2019 - 22-May-2019 weekly at 14-16, Pinni B 5005
Periods: I II III IV
Language of instruction: English

This course focuses on the methods used in the study of language variation and change. The methods of Labovian sociolinguistics, which form the backbone of most variationist approaches, will be discussed in some detail during the course. During the course we will examine in detail the methods used in sociolinguistic, dialectological and historical studies, some of them classics in the field, some representing recent trends in variationist linguistics. The course also includes a discussion of the statistical methods used in variationist linguistics.

A reading list will be provided at the beginning of the course.

Assessment is based on class participation, an oral presentation in the class, and a final essay.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Juhani Klemola, Teacher responsible
Juhani.Klemola[ät]uta.fi
Teaching
6-Sep-2018 – 29-Nov-2018
Tutorials
Thu 6-Sep-2018 - 11-Oct-2018 weekly at 14-16, Pinni B4079
Thu 25-Oct-2018 - 29-Nov-2018 weekly at 14-16, Pinni B4079
Periods: I II
Language of instruction: English

This course focuses on standard methods of studying text and discourse, and theories behind them, including both qualitative and quantitative methods of analyzing language use in its social context (e.g. critical discourse analysis, computer-mediated discourse analysis, and corpus-assisted discourse studies). The course readings include some classic studies and latest research in the field, and hands-on projects will familiarize students with the empirical analysis of text and discourse in practice. Course work includes weekly sessions, background readings, independent study, an oral presentation in the class, and a final essay (project paper).

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Minna Nevala, Teacher responsible
Minna.Nevala[ät]uta.fi
Teaching
4-Sep-2018 – 4-Dec-2018
Tutorials
Tue 4-Sep-2018 - 9-Oct-2018 weekly at 14-16, Pinni A3098
Tue 23-Oct-2018 - 4-Dec-2018 weekly at 14-16, Pinni A3098
Periods: I II
Language of instruction: English
Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Johannes Riquet, Teacher responsible
Teaching
6-Sep-2018 – 29-Nov-2018
Lectures
Thu 6-Sep-2018 - 11-Oct-2018 weekly at 9-12, Päätalo E222
Thu 25-Oct-2018 - 8-Nov-2018 weekly at 9-12, Päätalo E222
Thu 15-Nov-2018 at 9-12, Virta LS 112
Thu 22-Nov-2018 - 29-Nov-2018 weekly at 9-12, Päätalo E222
Thu 13-Dec-2018 at 9-12, Päätalo E222
Periods: I II
Language of instruction: English

This course is an introduction to the description and explanatory modeling of English syntax in a way that will take students far beyond the basics.

The focus will be on constituent structure, the hierarchical relationship between sentence constituents, and the reordering processes that permit us to formulate and comprehend a broad range of structures. This will enable students to understand and explain how the syntax of English works and how it contrasts with the syntax of other languages, but ultimately has much in common with the syntax of all languages. The learning goals for the course involve your acquiring the ability to analyze English sentences, to identify different types of main, complement, and adjunct clauses, and to formulate precise linguistic generalizations about the sentences and constructions that you analyze. This expertise can be applied, not just to standard English, but to regional and social varieties of English, as well as to Finnish and other languages you know, study, teach, and research.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Peter Slomanson, Teacher responsible
Peter.Slomanson[ät]uta.fi
Teaching
4-Sep-2018 – 4-Dec-2018
Tutorials
Tue 4-Sep-2018 - 4-Dec-2018 weekly at 12-14, Pinni B 4119
Periods: I II
Language of instruction: English

This course will address the question “What is Scottish Literature?” by examining the works of key authors from the Middle Ages to the present day to identify the social, historical, and cultural contexts and significant themes that have defined the Scottish literary canon. We will explore themes such as religion, duality, fantasy and the supernatural, language, and gender, and investigate the contributions of Scots, Gaelic, and Nordic cultures to identify the diverse influences that have shaped Scottish culture through the centuries. We will also discuss the theoretical controversies and social conflicts that have informed debate over the construction of the Scottish literary canon.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Kevin McGinley, Teacher responsible
Kevin.McGinley[ät]uta.fi
Teaching
3-Sep-2018 – 3-Dec-2018
Tutorials
Mon 3-Sep-2018 - 3-Dec-2018 weekly at 14-16, Pinni B 2078
Periods: I II
Language of instruction: English

Since Donald Trump announced the United States’ withdrawal from the “Iran Deal” in May 2018, Iran has been in the global news almost every day. This has led to an intensified circulation of different – and highly politicised – imaginaries about Iran, either reinforcing or contesting Trump’s portrayal of the Islamic Republic as the “leading state sponsor of terror.” These imaginaries have a long history, and this course explores the ways in which fictional representations have constructed conflicting visions of Iran, putting their own spin on political discourses that are themselves fuelled by imaginaries and myth. In the first part of the course, we will explore Western visions of Persia/Iran from the early seventeenth century (The Travailes of the Three English Brothers) to contemporary cinema. These imaginaries are often difficult to reconcile with each other and range from orientalist fantasies of Persian opulence and decadence to the recent representation of Iran as a threatening nuclear power. In the second part of the course, we will reverse the gaze and examine how Iranian-American authors and filmmakers have mobilised their own imaginaries to reflect on political events (such as the Iranian Revolution of 1979 and the terrorist attacks of 9/11) as well as the experience of diaspora and exile. As we will see, these fascinating works – from Azar Nafisi’s Reading Lolita in Tehran to Manoucher Parvin’s Dardedel and Porochista Khakpour’s The Last Illusion – conjure up nostalgic visions of Persia, adapt Persian literary traditions and adopt techniques such as magical realism to reflect on the contradictions of the distant homeland and the complexities of the Iranian-American experience. Throughout the course, we will draw on theoretical concepts and perspectives such as Orientalism (Said) and Occidentalism (Buruma and Margalit), cultural hybridity (Bhabha), planetarity (Spivak) and diaspora studies to develop a nuanced understanding of the primary texts.

Participants are required to read Ali Ansari’s Iran: A Very Short Introduction before the first session. A detailed syllabus will be circulated at the beginning of term. Students will be evaluated on the basis of an essay as well as additional smaller assignments.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Johannes Riquet, Teacher responsible
Johannes.Riquet[ät]uta.fi
Teaching
12-Sep-2018 – 12-Dec-2018
Tutorials
Wed 12-Sep-2018 - 10-Oct-2018 weekly at 12-14, Pinni B 2078
Wed 24-Oct-2018 - 12-Dec-2018 weekly at 12-14, Pinni B 2078
Periods: I II
Language of instruction: English

The course aims at exposing some of the many roles that the city, as a specific source of human experience, has played in literature from the nineteenth to the twenty-first century. To some extent, the course also explores literature’s influence on how individual cities are seen and understood. Our analysis will make use of a number of viewpoints, some of them solidly rooted in socio-historical conditions and others more clearly based on metaphorical (or metonymical) approaches to the city. In addition to examining several stories set in well-known cities, we will take a look at urban studies as a field and find ways of using its perspectives in readings of literary texts.

During the last few weeks of the course, students will give presentations on a literary or cinematic text not included in course materials.

Assessment: class participation, a group presentation, and a course diary.

Note: If you have taken the Literary Landscapes course in or before 2013, there will be some overlap, as previously that course also touched upon city literature.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Markku Salmela, Teacher responsible
Markku.Salmela[ät]uta.fi
Teaching
6-Sep-2018 – 29-Nov-2018
Tutorials
Thu 6-Sep-2018 - 11-Oct-2018 weekly at 14-16, Pinni B 2078
Thu 25-Oct-2018 - 29-Nov-2018 weekly at 14-16, Pinni B 2078
Periods: I II
Language of instruction: English

The course aims to introduce students to the use of electronic corpora and databases containing authentic language for a variety of purposes (checking grammar or word choice, regional variation, research). Through practical examples, a number of available corpora will be examined with the perspective of considering language use as a context-dependent issue. The usefulness of methodical analysis of electronic resources is highlighted in the critical approach and assessment of prescriptive, rule-based notions of correct language.

Course work includes regular attendance of weekly sessions, reading of a selection of research articles, homework assignments and group discussions, and a final written course report.

N.B. In the autumn semester 2017, the course with was offered as a methodology course (ENGS3 Methods in Corpus Linguistics) with largely similar approach and content.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Mark Kaunisto, Teacher responsible
Mark.Kaunisto[ät]uta.fi
Teaching
3-Sep-2018 – 11-Oct-2018
Tutorials
Mon 3-Sep-2018 - 8-Oct-2018 weekly at 10-12, Pinni B 3109
Thu 6-Sep-2018 - 11-Oct-2018 weekly at 10-12, Pinni B 4114
Periods: I
Language of instruction: English
Periodi (7.1.2019 - 3.3.2019)
Syventävät opinnot [III Periodi]
Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Juhani Norri, Teacher responsible
Juhani.Norri[ät]uta.fi
Teaching
8-Jan-2019 – 16-May-2019
Lectures
Tue 8-Jan-2019 - 19-Feb-2019 weekly at 16-18, Pinni A 1081
Thu 10-Jan-2019 - 21-Feb-2019 weekly at 14-15, Pinni B 4113
Tue 5-Mar-2019 - 16-Apr-2019 weekly at 16-18, Pinni A 1081
Thu 7-Mar-2019 - 11-Apr-2019 weekly at 14-15, Pinni B 4113
Tue 30-Apr-2019 - 14-May-2019 weekly at 16-18, Pinni A 1081
Thu 2-May-2019 - 16-May-2019 weekly at 14-15, Pinni B 4113
Periods: III IV
Language of instruction: English

This course will examine the development of British drama from the late seventeenth and eighteenth-century. Studying a selection of plays from genres including comedy, tragedy, satire, and ballad-opera, and attending to changes in the staging conventions of the period, we will examine the historical and social contexts of the drama and look at the theatre as a site of political and social debate that engaged with topics such as gender and power, imperialism, British identity, and political corruption.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Kevin McGinley, Teacher responsible
Kevin.McGinley[ät]uta.fi
Teaching
7-Jan-2019 – 13-May-2019
Tutorials
Mon 7-Jan-2019 - 18-Feb-2019 weekly at 12-14, Pinni B 3112
Mon 4-Mar-2019 - 15-Apr-2019 weekly at 12-14, Pinni B 3112
Mon 29-Apr-2019 - 13-May-2019 weekly at 12-14, Pinni B 3112
Periods: III IV
Language of instruction: English

This course explores a range of Arctic fantasies on page and screen, from explorers’ journals to Cold War cinema and recent environmental documentaries. The Arctic has taken centre stage as a region where climate change can be both observed and studied, and where pressing geopolitical and environmental questions are negotiated; the planting of a Russian flag under the Arctic ice in 2007 and the projected Alaska LNG pipeline are cases in point. Along with scientists and politicians, writers and filmmakers have turned to the Arctic, and fashioned it as a testing ground for various global fantasies and anxieties. In our course, we will critically examine this recent interest in the high North by reading it through the prism of a long-standing imaginative investment in the Arctic. We will explore the ways in which the Arctic has functioned as a space for the projection of cultural fantasies since the voyages of Martin Frobisher in the 1570s. As the search for the Northwest Passage and the North Pole was relaunched in the nineteenth century, authors and visual artists figured the Arctic as a sublime and spectacular wasteland hostile to human inhabitation. Politically, the Arctic was turned into a seemingly “pure” space where heroic male explorers could demonstrate the supremacy of nation and empire. In the twentieth century, the Arctic played an important imaginative role as a space connecting the superpowers during the Cold War. As we will see, this legacy continues to haunt contemporary representations of the Arctic. At the same time, indigenous authors and filmmakers have challenged “Southern” views of the high North and offered powerful visions of the Arctic as a transnational homeland.

Texts and films to be discussed range from Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and the cannibalism debate surrounding the disastrous Franklin expedition to contemporary Arctic dystopia in Sarah Moss’s Cold Earth and the mythological fiction of Inuit author Rachel Qitsualik-Tinsley. A detailed syllabus will be circulated before the beginning of the course. Students will be evaluated on the basis of an essay as well as additional smaller assignments.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Johannes Riquet, Teacher responsible
johannes.riquet[ät]uta.fi
Teaching
8-Jan-2019 – 14-May-2019
Tutorials
Tue 8-Jan-2019 - 19-Feb-2019 weekly at 14-16, Pinni B 3108
Tue 5-Mar-2019 - 16-Apr-2019 weekly at 14-16, Pinni B 3108
Tue 30-Apr-2019 - 14-May-2019 weekly at 14-16, Pinni B 3108
Periods: III IV
Language of instruction: English

This option will present students with an extensive coverage of the different ways in which new words are formed in English. The course will begin by a survey of the basic concepts relating to word-formation and morphology (affix, derivation, root, base, lexeme, opaqueness, transparency etc.). We shall then move on to examine the many different processes by which new words are formed in English (e.g. derivation, compounding, blending, clipping, sound-symbolism). The course ends with two relatively recent ways of putting together new words (cut-down puns and knock-knock words).

Course work includes regular attendance of the weekly sessions, homework assignments (theory handouts and practical exercises relating to various aspects of word-formation), and an end-of-term examination.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Juhani Norri, Teacher responsible
Juhani.Norri[ät]uta.fi
Teaching
11-Jan-2019 – 17-May-2019
Tutorials
Fri 11-Jan-2019 - 22-Feb-2019 weekly at 10-12, Pinni B 4031
Fri 8-Mar-2019 - 12-Apr-2019 weekly at 10-12, Pinni B 4031
Fri 26-Apr-2019 - 17-May-2019 weekly at 10-12, Pinni B 4031
Periods: III IV
Language of instruction: English

This is an introductory survey course that will enable students to understand major research questions and goals in second language acquisition, the extent of current knowledge in this area of inquiry, and how we can view the same questions from different theoretical vantage points. Two of the central questions for discussion will be whether there is a critical period for the native-like acquisition of a second language and the extent to which second language grammars (including systematically occurring non-native errors in syntax, morphology, and phonology) can be directly attributed to the influence of the grammar of the learner's native language.

The course will consist of weekly instruction, weekly readings to be summarized orally by pairs of students, active participation in discussions, short data collection assignments, and a final exam.

Enrolment for University Studies
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Peter Slomanson, Teacher responsible
Peter.Slomanson[ät]uta.fi
Teaching
7-Jan-2019 – 13-May-2019
Tutorials
Mon 7-Jan-2019 - 18-Feb-2019 weekly at 17-19, Pinni B 4086
Mon 4-Mar-2019 - 15-Apr-2019 weekly at 17-19, Pinni B 4086
Mon 29-Apr-2019 - 13-May-2019 weekly at 17-19, Pinni B 4086
Periods: III IV
Language of instruction: English

This course investigates the meanings of waste through literary and other cultural texts. Waste, through its numerous variants (rubbish, trash, dirt, filth, excrement, junk, refuse, pollution, garbage, litter, debris, and so on), is an unavoidable part of culture that reflects basic human compulsions, denials, desires and failures. It remains a pressing ethical and environmental question. Furthermore, as the ubiquitous ‘other’ of value and material consumption, it is inevitably both tangible and metaphoric. In its openness to recycling and classification, it has a lot in common with literature itself. During the course, we will study a range of theoretical perspectives that help us interpret and contextualize different types of waste appearing in fictions and elsewhere. We will also consider how understandings of waste depend on time and place, and how they have changed with new kinds of environmental awareness. Assessment will be by class participation and an essay.

Enrolment for University Studies
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Markku Salmela, Teacher responsible
Markku.Salmela[ät]uta.fi
Teaching
10-Jan-2019 – 16-May-2019
Tutorials
Thu 10-Jan-2019 - 21-Feb-2019 weekly at 10-12, Pinni B 4118
Thu 7-Mar-2019 - 11-Apr-2019 weekly at 10-12, Pinni B 4118
Thu 25-Apr-2019 - 16-May-2019 weekly at 10-12, Pinni B 4118
Periods: III IV
Language of instruction: English

This course will focus on the social aspects of language variation. The first half of the course will be devoted to a detailed discussion of some of the central issues in so-called Labovian sociolinguistics/microsociolinguistics. During the second half of the course the focus will be on a number of sociolinguistic topics including language and ethnicity, language, sex, and gender, language contact and language change.

A reading list will be provided at the beginning of the course.

Assessment is based on class participation, a presentation in the class, and a final essay.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Juhani Klemola, Teacher responsible
Juhani.Klemola[ät]uta.fi
Teaching
10-Jan-2019 – 16-May-2019
Tutorials
Thu 10-Jan-2019 - 21-Feb-2019 weekly at 12-14, Pinni B 4119
Thu 7-Mar-2019 - 11-Apr-2019 weekly at 12-14, Pinni B 4119
Thu 25-Apr-2019 - 16-May-2019 weekly at 12-14, Pinni B 4119
Periods: III IV
Language of instruction: English

This course examines the question of murder and representation, with a special focus on gender issues. We will concentrate on one type of murder, serial murder, as a cultural narrative from the end of the 19th century to the present. During the course we will analyse the cultural imagery and social contexts of serial killing in Britain and the United States. In particular, we will try to answer this question: how are gender and “normalcy” constructed through murder and crime narratives? We will start with the case of Jack the Ripper - the first “modern” serial killer - and his victims, and move on to representations of male and female psychopaths. We will explore such different genres as films and documentary programmes as well as texts written by FBI agents, serial killers and psychiatrists. We will also read three novels: Robert Bloch's Psycho, Bret Easton Ellis' American Psycho, and Helen Zahavi's Dirty Weekend.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Maarit Piipponen, Teacher responsible
Maarit.Piipponen[ät]uta.fi
Teaching
8-Jan-2019 – 14-May-2019
Tutorials
Tue 8-Jan-2019 - 19-Feb-2019 weekly at 12-14, Pinni A 2088
Tue 5-Mar-2019 - 16-Apr-2019 weekly at 12-14, Pinni A 2088
Tue 30-Apr-2019 - 14-May-2019 weekly at 12-14, Pinni A 2088
Periods: III IV
Language of instruction: English

Language is a powerful instrument for constructing and reflecting social and community identities. Who we are, how we identify with our own social group, our attitudes to other groups and cultures, are all interconnected with language use and language values. This course investigates the role of language in constructing individual and social identities, and associated theories and models including those of language attitudes, evaluation, identification, and representation. Attention will also be given to the nature and boundaries of language communities, language and gender, and language and nationality.

Mode of study

  1. lectures (20%)
  2. reading and Moodle assignments (20%)
  3. group work, oral group presentation, and final project essay (60%)


Learning outcomes

On successful completion of the course, a student will be able to:

  1. Discuss the nature of the relationship between language, community, and society
  2. Identify socio-cultural aspects of language use and identity construction
  3. Evaluate the effect of attitudes on inter-group communication
  4. Recognise and apply models of identity construction to language use
  5. Do group work and conduct an independent piece of group research

Grading

scale 1-5

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Minna Nevala, Teacher responsible
Minna.Nevala[ät]uta.fi
Teaching
8-Jan-2019 – 14-May-2019
Tutorials
Tue 8-Jan-2019 - 19-Mar-2019 weekly at 14-16, Päätalo A2B
Tue 5-Mar-2019 - 16-Apr-2019 weekly at 14-16, Päätalo A2B
Tue 30-Apr-2019 - 14-May-2019 weekly at 14-16, Päätalo A2B
Periods: III IV
Language of instruction: English

This course reviews linguistic as well as various socio-cultural aspects of English as a global language, paying attention to both theory and practice. The course has three main aims. Firstly, it briefly outlines the development and characteristics of English as a global language – the variation, change and diversification of English in different regions, societies, communities and settings in the world – with specific emphasis on non-native-speaker contexts. Secondly, the course provides a critical overview of issues around and debates on the impact of the spread of English in the world. Thirdly, it familiarizes students with a range of linguistic and discourse-pragmatic approaches to studying English as a global language, also providing suggestions and support for pro gradu research in this area. Course work includes weekly sessions, background reading, and a mini project, its oral presentation and written report.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Hanna Parviainen, Teacher responsible
Teaching
9-Jan-2019 – 15-May-2019
Tutorials
Wed 9-Jan-2019 - 20-Feb-2019 weekly at 16-18, Pinni B 5005
Wed 6-Mar-2019 - 10-Apr-2019 weekly at 16-18, Pinni B 5005
Wed 24-Apr-2019 at 16-18, Pinni B 5005
Wed 8-May-2019 - 15-May-2019 weekly at 16-18, Pinni B 5005
Periods: III IV
Language of instruction: English
Syventävien vaihtoehtoisiksi sopivat muut opinnot [III Periodi]

Kurssin sisältä rakentuu konkreettisen, huhtikuussa toteutettavan näyttelyn ympärille. Finlaysonin kielimaailmat -näyttely rakennetaan kurssilla yhteistyössä työväenmuseo Werstaan ja visuaalisen journalismin opiskelijoiden kanssa. Näyttelyssä havainnollistetaan Finlaysonin alueen monikielistä historiaa ja nykypäivää eli se on myös oman alan tiedeviestintää museokontekstissa. Kurssilla perehdytään sosiolingvistiseen tutkimukseen mm. paikallismurteen, monikielisyyden, kielikontaktien ja translatorisuuden näkökulmista. Kurssilla sekä kootaan olemassa olevaa tutkimustietoa että kerätään kenttätyössä uusia aineistoja. Näistä aineksista rakennetaan museokävijää puhuttelevia esityskokonaisuuksia näyttelytilaan.

Tutkinto-opiskelijoiden ilmoittautuminen
Ilmoittautuminen Nettiopsussa on päättynyt
Kaisa Koskinen, Vastaava opettaja
Kaisa.A.Koskinen[ät]uta.fi
Opetus
11.1.2019 – 24.5.2019
Luento-opetus
Pe 11.1.2019 klo 12-15, Pinni B 1097
Pe 18.1.2019 klo 12-15, Pinni B 4113
Pe 25.1.2019 - 24.5.2019 viikoittain klo 12-15, Pinni B 4117
Periodit: III IV
Opetuskieli: suomi
Periodi (4.3.2019 - 26.5.2019)
Syventävät opinnot [IV Periodi]

In this three-day event, the world’s first of its kind, we will jointly read Edmund Spenser’s epic poem The Faerie Queene (1590/1596) and embark on a wild ride through a world of knights, dragons and magical creatures. We will thereby return poetry to its origins of being recited and enjoyed communally. The event will begin with a mini-conference on Friday afternoon, with lectures by Dr Antoinina Bevan Zlatar (Zurich), a renowned early modernist, and others. These lectures will introduce you to the literary, cultural and linguistic contexts of Spenser’s work and thereby prepare you for the reading. The reading itself will begin on Friday evening and end on Sunday evening.

Students wishing to earn credit for the marathon reading are required to attend the entire event and write a short report (2-3 pages).

Participants should bring a copy of The Faerie Queene to the event. Recommend edition: Penguin Classics.

Enrolment for University Studies
Enrolment time has expired
Johannes Riquet, Teacher responsible
Johannes.Riquet[ät]uta.fi
Teaching
26-Apr-2019 – 28-Apr-2019
Tutorials
Fri 26-Apr-2019 at 9.00-23.59, Place TBA, (with introductory lectures)
Sat 27-Apr-2019 at 9.00-23.59, Place TBA
Sun 28-Apr-2019 at 10.00-23.59, Place TBA
Periods: IV
Language of instruction: English