Master's Programme in Multilingual Communication and Translation Studies

Upon successful completion of the Master's Programme in Multilingual Communication and Translation Studies, the student will have an excellent command of at least two languages: their A working language, Finnish, and their B working language, which can be English, French, Swedish, German, or Russian. During the Master's studies, the student will achieve solid expertise in one of the following fields of specialisation: translation in law and administration, translation in business and technology, literary and audiovisual translation, general interpreting, or court interpreting. Those who study Russian may also specialise in interpreting for healthcare industry. In addition, a graduate with a Master's degree in Multilingual Communication and Translation Studies will possess excellent communication skills, a wide knowledge of the culture in the countries where their B working language is spoken, the ability to apply the scientific knowledge of their discipline, and the skills required for doctoral studies. The Master's Programme in Multilingual Communication and Translation Studies includes a study module in Finnish language, which is tailored for translation students.

Learning Outcomes

A graduate with a Master of Arts degree will possess the following academic and general skills:

  • good knowledge of the contents of the advanced studies completed during the Master's programme
  • ability to apply scientific knowledge and methods and the ability to work independently
  • ability to work as an expert in their field
  • team work and project work skills required in professional life
  • problem-solving skills
  • ability to design and conduct an independent scientific study and to present the research findings appropriately, employing previous research in a critical but respectful manner
  • wide knowledge of the research methods applied within their discipline and the ability to demonstrate sound scientific reasoning and argumentation.

In addition, a graduate who has successfully completed the Master's Programme in Multilingual Communication and Translation Studies

  • will be able to explain the requirements and conditions of professional translation and interpretation and will be capable of contributing to the development of their field
  • will be able to work as a translator or an interpreter of their working languages in their chosen field of specialisation
  • will be able to analyse, interpret, produce, and proofread texts in a competent and professional manner
  • will be able to analyse their own need for information and search for information using versatile sources
  • will be able to use the key tools of their field and maintain their technological skills
  • will be aware of the social and societal role of a translator or interpreter and will be able to act professionally and ethically in multilingual and multicultural communication situations with customers and other stakeholders
  • will be familiar with the terminology and research methods of translation studies
  • will be able to apply scientific knowledge and research results to translation and interpretation and will possess the skills required for scientific research and doctoral studies.

Study Planning and Guidance

The student will revise the personal study plan (HOPS) prepared during their Bachelor's studies at least once during their Master's studies together with a HOPS instructor who is familiar with the Master's Programme in Multilingual Communication and Translation Studies. If the student does not wish to complete all of the required course units within one field of specialisation but instead intends to combine courses from different fields of specialisation, they must revise their personal study plan with the instructor before beginning advanced studies.

The study coordinator responsible for the Master's Programme in Multilingual Communication and Translation Studies will offer advice on all types of study-related questions, such as on choosing optional study modules or on completing the degree programme's study modules.

Progressing in your Studies

The student will specialise in one of the following fields of specialisation within the Master's Programme in Multilingual Communication and Translation Studies:

  1. Translation in Law and Administration
  2. Translation in Business and Technology
  3. Literary and Audiovisual Translation
  4. General Interpreting
  5. Court Interpreting
  6. Interpreting for Healthcare Industry (only in language pair Finnish–Russian).

The fields of specialisation available to each language pair are listed in the document explaining the [link]structure of the exam[/ link] (in Finnish). The student will choose their field of specialisation in the spring of the third year of their studies. Alternatively, the student may complete course units from several different fields of specialisation, forming an appropriate combination. In this case, the proportion of theoretical studies to practical courses must remain approximately the same as in the original study modules: the student must complete at least 15 credits of theoretical studies, and at least 5 credits of practical courses involving translation from and into both working languages.

It is recommended that the thesis studies are completed during the student's second year of Master's studies. The Research and Methodology in Translation Studies course unit should be completed during the academic year preceding the thesis studies.

Completion Marks for Study Modules

The completion mark for advanced studies is usually requested during the final stages of studies. It is recommended to complete Advanced Studies as systematically as possible with the help of Curricula Guides, personal study plan (HOPS) counselling, and other academic counselling. This helps to prevent unpleasant surprises in terms of missing course units. The completion mark for the Advanced Studies is given by the professor responsible for the working language in question.

The student will receive an overall grade for the Advanced Studies. The grade will be the weighted average of all the numeric grades received (including the Master's thesis), calculated in relation to the number of credits. In order for the student to receive the completion mark for Advanced Studies, they must have a completion mark for the Finnish for Translators II (10 ECTS) study module, which is part of the Master of Arts degree. The completion mark for the Finnish for Translators II study module is given by the study coordinator responsible for the Master's Programme in Multilingual Communication and Translation Studies.

Compulsory Prerequisites

Prior to beginning the Master's Programme in Multilingual Communication and Translation Studies, the student must complete the following study modules and course units:

English, German, and Russian Translation and Interpretation study tracks:

French Translation study track:

Swedish Translation study track:

The student may, however, complete individual course units belonging to the Master's studies even before they have completed all the above-mentioned prerequisites.

If a study track within the Master's Programme in Multilingual Communication and Translation Studies has more applicants than can be accepted into it, the grades for the following course units will be used as the selection criteria:

 English Translation study track:

French Translation study track:

Swedish Translation study track:

German Translation and Interpreting study track:

Russian Translation and Interpreting study track:

Internationalisation

The University of Tampere is committed to promoting justice and equality in society, to enhancing the well-being of citizens at home and abroad, and to advancing multiculturalism and sustainable development.

More information on the Internationalisation module, which is part of the studies, is available in the description of each degree programme.

Definition of Working Language

The working languages of a translator or an interpreter are defined as follows:

A Working Language
The language which the translator or interpreter knows best and uses both as a source and a target language. Usually, it is the person's native language, in which they have achieved the level of a communication professional.

B Working Language
A foreign language which the translator or interpreter knows well enough to be able to use it as a target language in certain conditions, such as when the assignment and the level of difficulty are appropriate.

C Working Language
A foreign language which the translator or interpreter knows so well that they can use it as a source language. A translator or interpreter may have several C working languages.

Faculty of Communication Sciences