Degree Programme in English Language, Literature and Translation

The Degree Programme in English Language, Literature and Translation offers a Bachelor's Programme in English Language, Literature and Translation, a Master's Programme in English Language and Literature as well as a Master's Programme in Multilingual Communication and Translation Studies. The general language proficiency level for students accepted for the Bachelor's degree programme is B2-C1 (CEFR). At the Bachelor's level, students specialize either in language and literature or in translation and interpreting. Students specializing in translation and interpreting are required to have an excellent command of Finnish, and they are offered a separate study module of Finnish both in the Bachelor's and in the Master's degree programmes. The Bachelor's Programme in English Language, Literature and Translation prepares students for a wide range of professional tasks. The studies in English language and literature deal with language structure, usage, variation and learning. In addition, students familiarize themselves with English literary genres, cultural material and literatures of various periods and countries. The studies in translation and interpreting focus on translation studies, language and culture, thus introducing students to the professional translation of marketing-related texts, EU documents, manuals and literature. In the Master's programmes, students attain a strong expertise in their specialized field. Moreover, they gain the ability to apply scientific knowledge in practice and build the skills required for postgraduate studies. In the Master's Programme in English Language and Literature, students can specialize, for example, in the structure of English, literary genres, the interaction between language and society, or the social implications of literature. Students in the Master's Programme in Multilingual Communication and Translation Studies specialize either in languages for special purposes, literary and audiovisual translation, or interpreting. The degree programme is intended primarily for Finnish-speaking students. The Bachelor degree programme in particular includes courses that are taught only in Finnish (these include compulsory translation, language and communication studies as well as optional courses).

Learning Outcomes

Learning outcomes

A graduate with a Bachelor of Arts degree

  • will be able to engage in active interaction in their working life
  • will be familiar with the basics of their degree programme's discipline and will be able to follow the development of their field
  • will know the principles of scientific reasoning and working methods
  • will understand the basic principles of ethics in science and research
  • will be able to write scientific texts in such a manner that they will cite or refer to the work of others according to the established conventions of the discipline
  • will be able to acquire scientific information, assess it critically, and apply it to solving scientific questions in their own field
  • will be able to use Finnish and Swedish on a level that is required from all personnel of bilingual State authorities according to section 6 subsection 1 in the Finnish Act on the Knowledge of Languages Required of Personnel in Public Bodies (424/2003), and on a level that is required within their field
  • will be able to use at least one foreign language on a level that enables them to follow the development of their field and function in an international environment
  • will be able to utilise information technology on the basic level required in working life.

A graduate with a Bachelor of Arts degree who has successfully completed the Bachelor's Programme in English Language, Literature, and Translation will have the following skills and knowledge related to their own field of study:

Communication skills

The student will be able to

  • communicate in various communicative situations that require a command of English
  • read critically and analyse different types of English texts (such as scientific texts, literary texts, and factual prose)
  • produce fluent writing in English
  • argue systematically as well as analyse the arguments of others.

Subject-specific skills

The student will be able to

  • master the basic concepts within their field of study and analyse both spoken and written language using these concepts
  • communicate on topics related to their field and present well-grounded arguments
  • actively and independently apply the acquired knowledge in order to produce academic and professional texts in both spoken and written form
  • compare their own culture with the cultures of English-speaking countries
  • explain and use the central concepts within their chosen field of specialisation and study path
  • independently produce a thesis related to their discipline.


In addition, a graduate with a Bachelor of Arts degree who has successfully completed the English Translation and Interpreting study path, including Basics of Multilingual Communication and Translation Studies and Finnish for Translators I, will possess the following communication and subject-specific skills:

  • They will know the basic principles of professional, multilingual translation and interpreting.
  • They will be able to translate standard language texts from English into Finnish and simple standard language texts from Finnish into English in a professional manner.
  • They will be able to interpret short speech turns in everyday situations from English into Finnish and vice versa.
  • They will know the basic principles of terminology and be able to use them when translating.
  • They will be able to justify what type of Finnish language use is effective and appropriate in various situations.

Master's studies

A graduate with a Master of Arts degree from the Degree Programme in English Language, Literature, and Translation

  • will be able to work independently and to apply scientific knowledge and methods in their work
  • will be able to work as an expert in their field
  • will be able to work in diverse teams and projects
  • will be able to solve novel, complex problems encountered in their work and other activities
  • will be able to identify the limits of their knowledge and skills and complement their expertise independently
  • will be able to design and conduct an independent scientific study and to present the research findings appropriately, employing previous research in a critical but respectful manner
  • will have a wide knowledge of the research methods applied within their discipline and the ability to demonstrate sound scientific reasoning and argumentation.

A graduate with a Master of Arts degree who has successfully completed the Master's Programme in English Language and Literature

  • will be highly proficient in using the English language in various contexts and able to adapt their language use to each communication situation
  • will master the research methods applied in the area of specialisation they have chosen within the field of English language or literary studies and will be able to apply their knowledge to solving new research problems
  • will be able to work as an expert in the field of English language or literature in a variety of professions
  • will be able to carry out independent research within their discipline
  • will be able to apply scientific knowledge and research results to the English language and English-language literature, and will possess the skills required for scientific doctoral studies.

A graduate with a Master of Arts degree who has successfully completed the Master's Programme in Multilingual Communication and Translation Studies

  • will be able to explain the requirements and conditions of professional translation and interpretation and will be capable of working as an expert in their field, contributing to its development
  • will be able to work as a translator or an interpreter of their working languages in their chosen field of specialisation
  • will be able to analyse, interpret, produce, and proofread texts in a competent and professional manner
  • will be able to analyse their own need for information and to search for information using various sources
  • will be able to use the key tools of their field and update their technological skills
  • will be aware of the social and societal role of a translator or interpreter and will be able to act professionally and ethically in multilingual and multicultural communication situations with customers and other stakeholders
  • will be able to produce written and spoken Finnish that is appropriate to a given context and communicative goals, and to edit Finnish texts for improved readability, clarity, and consistency with writing conventions
  • will be familiar with the terminology and research methods of translation studies
  • will be able to apply scientific knowledge and research results to translation and interpreting and will possess the skills required for scientific research and doctoral studies.

Study Planning and Guidance

Academic counselling will be provided for new students at the beginning of their first autumn semester in the form of tutoring and personal study plans (HOPS). Tutoring is organised by student associations. The student should prepare a personal study plan during their first semester. Additionally, new students will discuss their personal study plans with a member of the degree programme personnel. In addition to the student's HOPS instructor, the student can also consult the head of academic counselling or the study coordinator responsible for the degree programme; they will offer advice on all types of study-related questions, such as choosing optional study modules or completing the degree programme's study modules.

Progressing in your Studies

The degree programme contains two degrees. The Bachelor's degree, or the Bachelor of Arts degree, is designed to take three years to complete and includes a Bachelor's thesis and a maturity test. The Master's degree, or the Master of Arts degree, is designed to take two years to complete. The major part of the Master's degree consists of Advanced Studies (including a Master's thesis) in the Master's programme the student has chosen. Basic-level course units should be completed prior to more advanced course units; a course unit belonging to Basic Studies, for example, should be completed before taking the corresponding course unit belonging to Intermediate Studies.

Some course units may be completed by taking a book exam. More information on exams is available in the Teaching Schedules.

First Academic Year

During their first academic year, the student should complete the Basic Studies in English Language, Literature, and Translation, and at least one of the following course units belonging to the Common Core Studies:

  • LTLY01 Introduction to Phonetics and General Linguistics 5 ECTS
  • LTLY03 Introduction to Translation 5 ECTS
  • KIRP1 Introduction to Literary Poetics 5 ECTS
  • KIRP2 Literature, Culture, and Society 5 ECTS

Students who choose the English Translation and Interpreting study path must complete at least LTLY03 Introduction to Translation, which is included in the Basics of Multilingual Communication and Translation Studies preceding the Master's Programme in Multilingual Communication and Translation Studies. In order to broaden their expertise, the student may complete more than one of the above-mentioned common core course units. The Basic Studies consist partly of course units compulsory for all degree programme students, partly of course units divided into different study paths.

The following compulsory studies common for all students (15 ECTS) shall be completed during the first and second period of the student's first year:

  • ENGP1 Structure of English I (5 ECTS)
  • ENGP2 Writing the Nation (5 ECTS)
  • ENGP3 Translation and Academic Writing (5 ECTS)

After completing the Basic Studies common to all degree programme students, the student shall choose 15 ECTS of course units from two different study paths: the English Language and Literature study path, and the English Translation and Interpreting study path. The student may either complete all the course units belonging to one of these study paths within Basic Studies, or they may freely combine course units from both study paths. In order to acquire teacher qualification, the student must complete the entire English Language and Literature study path.

Second and Third Academic Year

To complete the Intermediate Studies, all students must complete the following compulsory studies:

  • ENGA1 Seminar, Bachelor's Thesis, and Maturity Test (10 ECTS)
  • ENGA6 Variety in Present-day English (5 ECTS).

The remaining intermediate-level studies will be chosen from [link]the Alternative Studies (30 ECTS)[/link]. The Alternative Studies consist of Common Alternative Studies and course units belonging to two different study paths: the English Language and Literature study path, and the English Translation and Interpreting study path. During the intermediate studies, the student must complete the entire study path that corresponds to the Master's programme they plan to choose. In order to acquire teacher qualification, the student must complete the entire English Language and Literature study path.

[link]A student who chooses to continue to the Master's Programme in Multilingual Communication and Translation Studies must include the following two study modules in the optional studies of their Bachelor's degree: Basics of Multilingual Communication and Translation Studies, and Finnish for Translators I.

The final part of Intermediate Studies consists of a Bachelor's thesis and a maturity test, which are required for the Bachelor of Arts degree. The student will write their Bachelor's thesis during the seminar belonging to Intermediate Studies. The degree programme offers seminar groups that will focus on either linguistics, literature, and culture or translation and interpreting. The student will select a seminar group that corresponds to the Master's programme they plan to choose. Students who choose the Master's Programme in English Language and Literature will write their Bachelor's thesis in English, whereas students who choose the Master's Programme in Multilingual Communication and Translation Studies may write their thesis in either Finnish or English. [link]The School of Language, Translation, and Literary Studies has produced guidelines for thesis writers[/link] (in Finnish), and the degree programme offers [link]guidelines for assessing Bachelor's theses[/link] (in Finnish).

The Bachelor's degree should usually be completed before embarking on advanced studies that belong to the Master's degree. To receive their Bachelor's degree, the student must complete the required Language Skills course units that belong to General Studies. A student planning to choose the Master's Programme in English Language and Literature must complete the required course units in Swedish Language and in Finnish Language. In contrast, a student who chooses the Master's Programme in Multilingual Communication and Translation Studies must only complete the course unit in Swedish Language; instead of the General Studies course unit in Finnish Language, the student will have to complete the [link]Finnish for Translators I[/link] study module compulsory for students in Multilingual Communication and Translation Studies.

Choosing the Master's Programme

A student who has completed the Bachelor's Programme in English Language, Literature, and Translation may continue their studies in one of the following two Master’s programmes:

  • Master's Programme in English Language, and Literature (45 students annually, 55 in 2016 and 2017) or
  • Master's Programme in Multilingual Communication and Translation Studies (15 students annually).

The Master's programme into which the student will be accepted will be specified in the spring of the student's second year of study. This is when the student must state which Master's programme they wish to enter. The choice is binding. Based on defined criteria, the student will be granted a right to study in a specific Master's programme before the third year of their studies begins. Those who choose the Master's Programme in English Language and Literature must complete the following prerequisite before the Master's studies:

  • English Language and Literature study path (Intermediate Studies)

The students who study English and choose the Master's Programme in Multilingual Communication and Translation Studies must complete the following prerequisites before their Master's studies:

  • English Translation and Interpreting study path (Intermediate Studies)
  • Basics of Multilingual Communication and Translation Studies
  • Finnish for Translators I

Degree programme students may, however, complete individual course units belonging to the Master's studies even before they have completed all of the above-mentioned prerequisites. In doing so, compulsory prerequisites for individual course units should, nonetheless, be observed. A student who has completed equivalent Bachelor's studies at another university may also be accepted into the Master's programmes. If one of the Master's programmes has more applicants than can be accepted into it, the grades for following course units will be used as the selection criteria:

  • ENGP1 Structure of English I (5 ECTS)
  • ENGP2 Writing the Nation (5 ECTS)
  • ENGP3 Translation and Academic Writing (5 ECTS)
  • ENGA6 Variety in Present-day English (5 ECTS)

Completing the Master's Programme in Multilingual Communication and Translation Studies requires very good Finnish skills. The student’s Finnish language skills are assessed when their right to study in the Master's programme is specified. Primarily, the student's Finnish skills are assessed based on their grade in the Finnish language and literature that they have received in the Finnish Matriculation Examination; the student’s grade for the Finnish as a Mother Tongue test must be magna cum laude approbatur or higher. If the grade is lower or the student has not completed the test at all, their Finnish skills will be tested in a separate written exam.

The student may change their choice of Master's programme even after it has been specified if their plans should change. [link]More information on changing the Master's programme[/link].

Recommendations and Examples of Optional Study Modules

It is recommended that the student chooses their optional studies primarily on the basis of what subjects they are interested in. It is also important to weigh interest in a subject against its potential to benefit future employment.

In terms of potential professions, the degree programme in English Language, Literature, and Translation offers a few distinct options: a teacher, translator, and interpreter. Becoming qualified for these professions takes place primarily and predominantly within the degree programme studies. However, for each of these professions, well-chosen optional studies are also of vital importance.

In all of these professions, a second working language (or third if Finnish is included) is always an asset. It may often be said that English alone will be sufficient. In practice, however, translators and interpreters, as well as teachers, will have much better employment opportunities if they are fluent in two languages (excluding Finnish). [link]Optional studies offered by the language degree programmes.[/link]

For the students aiming to become teachers, the Teacher's Pedagogical Studies offered by the School of Education are even more important than a second language, as these studies are required in order to become a [link]qualified teacher.[/link] For a student aiming to become a teacher, the required ECTS credits for Optional Studies in the normal degree programme (180 BA + 120 MA) will be completed by the Teacher's Pedagogical Studies, studies that give a sufficient qualification in a second language, and other studies required by the degree programme - ([links]Common Core Studies, General Studies.[/links])

A student aiming to become a translator or interpreter needs to take into account that their optional studies will partially be filled by the following Multilingual Communication and Translation studies: [links]Finnish for Translators I, and Basics of Multilingual Communication and Translation Studies.[/links]

Translators and interpreters also considerably benefit from studies that develop business acumen, as the vast majority of translators and interpreters work as some type of entrepreneur. These types of studies include [links]Business Studies, and Entrepreneurship Studies[/links] in particular. These business-related studies are also useful for those who complete the degree programme and become experts in the English language without any specific profession in mind.

The student can also increase or further focus their expertise by completing some of the following optional studies, which are appropriate for those studying in the Degree Programme in English Language, Literature, and Translation:

  • Technical Communications Programme (What is technical communication?)
  • Journalism
  • Information Studies and Interactive Media (e.g. library work)
  • Computer Sciences (e.g. interactive technology)

Completion Marks and Assessment of Study Modules

The student can apply for completion marks for Basic Studies and Intermediate Studies as soon as they have successfully completed all of the studies required by the Curricula Guides and the course units have been registered in the student's academic records. By requesting a completion mark as soon as possible after the last required course unit has been completed, the student can ensure that they are progressing in their studies in a constructive and sensible manner. When the studies required for a completion mark are inspected as soon as possible, any missing course units can be promptly detected, which prevents problems with the progression of the student's studies. Studies that belong to the set required for a completion mark do not become obsolete due to any curriculum reforms.

An overall numeric grade of 1–5 will be given for both Basic Studies and Intermediate Studies based on the average of the grades received, and taking into consideration the ECTS granted for each course. Advanced Studies are also given an overall average grade in the same manner as Basic Studies and Intermediate Studies. The student’s Master's thesis is also included in calculating the grade for Advanced Studies in the same way as any other course unit.

Working Life Connections

Studies in English Language and Literature provide a route to becoming a teacher. However, students that have graduated from English Language and Literature Studies are also employed in many other professions that require expertise in the English language. In addition to the field of education, these professions include positions in industry and business life, diplomacy, government work, library work, publishing, communications and journalism, international organisations, marketing, tourism, management and development, as well as research.

The English Language and Literature Studies regularly organise working life events (career and entrepreneur events) together with the student association for students of foreign languages. These events receive visitors from career and recruitment services, as well as other guest speakers that describe their personal career paths in the field of language and culture and explain what kind of positions their studies prepared and qualified them for. These types of events help to reinforce professional networks and interest groups relationships. Additionally, the studies provide those already graduated with the opportunity for further education. Particularly essential are the further education options aimed at subject teachers.

Graduates of English Translation and Interpreting Studies will be qualified for different translation, interpreting, and communication positions, all of which require professional knowledge of multilingual communications. With regard to practical working life skills, English Translation and Interpreting Studies offer the opportunity to complete various studies where the student can have a direct connection to working life, such as a free choice internship. During their studies, the student will also complete some authentic translation and interpretation assignments. In addition, it is also possible for the student to produce their Master's thesis for an external client.

The relationship between studies and working life is further facilitated by the fact that English Translation and Interpreting Studies and the Master's Programme in Multilingual Communication and Translation Studies cooperate with relevant unions in the field ([links]The Finnish Association of Translators and Interpreters SKTL, Translation Industry Professionals KAJ, Association of Finnish Translation Companies SKTOL[/links]) by organising university visits and information sessions, among other things. Furthermore, several teachers have extensive work experience in the field. In addition, the degree programme organises separate information sessions and a special course unit called Translators' and Interpreters' Professional Business Skills that often receive guest lecturers from the business and professional world. Specialised subjects in the Master's programmes are designed in accordance with the needs of the professional world.

Internationalisation

The University of Tampere is committed to promoting justice and equality in society, to enhancing the well-being of citizens at home and abroad, and to advancing multiculturalism and sustainable development.

The Degree Programme in English Language, Literature, and Translation introduces the student to internationalisation. The degree programme students will acquire a thorough understanding of the cultures of English speaking countries. A student specialising in English language and literature will have a distinct understanding of the English language and the special features of English literature. A student specialising in translation and interpreting will have in-depth knowledge of both Finnish and English cultural communications, and of the way in which the two work together.

The student can develop their international competence in many respects through the language residency in an English-speaking country, which is included in the degree programme. All degree programme course units that are suitable for the Internationalisation Module are listed in the electronic Curricula Guides.

Alternatively, the student may also complete internationalisation studies through a student exchange at one of the school’s or university’s exchange destinations.

Faculty of Communication Sciences